New Focus of ERISA Fee Litigation

According to Troutman Sanders ERISA attorneys Jonathan A. Kenter and Gail H. Cutler, the outcome of a recent 401(k) plan lawsuit known as Tussey v. ABB did more than force the sponsor to write a check for $37 million. It led to lessons learned about the need to regularly review record-keeping and investment management fees, negotiate for rebates if possible and adhere to documented investment guidelines. What it did not resolve was "whether the record keeping costs of a 401(k) plan may be borne exclusively by those participants whose investment funds enjoy revenue sharing...while participants whose accounts are invested in investment funds with no revenue sharing pay little or nothing."

In "The Next Frontier in Fiduciary Oversight Litigation?" (April 27, 2012) they suggest that courts will likely be asked to opine as to whether ERISA fiduciaries have justified prevailing revenue sharing arrangements, taking allocation and class-based fee levels into account. Their recommendation is to decide on a disciplined approach that makes sense rather than making arbitrary decisions. Allocation rules to consider include the following:

  • Apportion record keeping fees on a pro-rata basis so that each participant is only charged his or her "fair share." Credit any revenue sharing received back to the "funds or participants as part of a periodic expense balance true-up."
  • Levy the same record keeping fee for each participant. Allocate revenue sharing monies ratably "to all investment funds or participants."
  • Adopt a combined pro-rata and per capital allocation such that a record keeping fee would consist of a fixed amount and a variable amount. Imposing a cap on total fees could be included.
  • "Hard wire the allocation method in the plan document" so that how record keeping fees are charged becomes a settlor function versus a fiduciary task.

In 2007, the ERISA Advisory Council's Working Group on Fiduciary Responsibilities and Revenue Sharing Practices reviewed industry practices as a way to improve disclosure for 401(k) plan participants. One recommendation made to the U.S. Department of Labor thereafter was to categorize payments for certain professional services as settlor functions and thereby protect fiduciaries from allegations of breach. Another request was for clarification that revenue sharing is not a plan asset "unless and until it is credited to the plan in accordance with the documents governing the revenue sharing."

With ERISA Rule 408(b)(2) fee disclosure compliance just ahead, numerous questions remain. This had led litigators and transaction attorneys alike to comment that further lawsuits and enforcement actions are likely to follow.

Note: Interested persons can read "Final Regulation Relating to Service Provider Disclosures Under Section 408(b)(2)," published the U.S. Department of Labor in February 2012.