ERISA Litigation and Enforcement: Role of Independent Fiduciary and Financial Advisor Best Practices

Mark your calendars to attend an educational webinar entitled "ERISA Litigation and Enforcement: The Role of the Independent Fiduciary and Best Practices for Financial Advisors." Sponsored by fi360 and eligible for continuing education credit, this April 8, 2015 event will take place between 3:00 pm and 4:00 pm EST and address important and timely issues for plan sponsors and their advisors. Details are provided below.

Description: ERISA litigation and enforcement increasingly involves allegations of conflicts of interest and imprudent decision-making on the part of advisors, consultants, banks and asset managers. In several recent matters, regulators and judges have made it clear that the use of an independent fiduciary would be interpreted as a reflection of procedural prudence and the absence of an independent fiduciary could hasten a decision of fiduciary breach.

Learning objectives:

  • Learn about relevant cases and regulatory actions that involve third parties such as financial advisors;
  • Hear a discussion about how advisors, consultants, banks and asset managers can work effectively to demonstrate procedural prudence; and
  • Better understand what state trust law and ERISA oversight activity means for advisors and consultants who work with non-ERISA trusts.

Speakers:

  • Thomas Clark, Esquire (Counsel - The Wagner Law Group)
  • Susan Mangiero, PhD, AIFA, CFA, FRM, PPC (Managing Director - Fiduciary Leadership, LLC)
  • Mitchell Shames, Esquire (Partner - Harrison Fiduciary Group) 

Please join as your schedule permits. Click here to register.

U.S. Supreme Court and Tibble v Edison International

According to SCOTUSBLOG.com, Glenn Tibble, et al. v. Edison International, et al ("Tibble v Edison") is seeing continued action after a petition for a writ of certiorari was filed on October 30, 2013 by counsel of record for the petitioners. Click here to download the 319 page document. On February 7, 2014, attorneys for respondents filed a brief in opposition. On March 3, petitioners' counsel filed a supplemental brief. Thereafter, on March 24 of this year, the Solicitor General was asked to file a brief in this ERISA fee case. That brief has now been filed and can be accessed by clicking here. (Thank you to Fiduciary Matters lead blogger, Attorney Thomas Clark, for sending the file.)

According to this 29-page "Brief For The United States As Amicus Curiae," the Solicitor General, the Solicitor of Labor and others conclude that the petition for a writ of certiorari should be granted with respect to the question as to "[w]hether a claim that ERISA plan fiduciaries breached their duty of prudence by offering higher-cost retail-class mutual funds to plan participants, even though identical lower-cost institutional-class mutual funds were available, is barred by 29 U.S.C. 1113(1) when fiduciaries initially chose the higher-cost mutual funds as plan investments more than six years before the claim was filed."

As an economist who leaves the legal issues for attorneys to vet, it seems that this filing opens the door to another review of ERISA matters by the U.S. Supreme Court. Whether that is good or bad, depends on your perspective. I would like to think that further discussions about fiduciary best practices by the highest U.S. court would be a positive outcome.