Dr. Lee Heavner Joins Dr. Susan Mangiero to Discuss Derivatives and Fiduciary Duty

As a follow-up to my January 12, 2017 announcement about retirement plan risk management education with the Professional Risk Managers' International Association ("PRMIA"), I am delighted to announce a co-presenter for the March 2, 2017 learning event. Distinguished economist Dr. Lee Heavner will join me to talk about hedging techniques, the valuation of derivatives and structured products and the monitoring of investment-related risk as part of "Use of Derivatives in Pension Plans." Click here to read Lee Heavner's impressive bio as a managing principal and financial expert with Analysis Group, Inc. Dr. Heavner and Dr. Mangiero have worked on multiple investment disputes and are the authors of "Economic Analysis in Fiduciary Monitoring Disputes Following the Supreme Court's 'Tibble' Ruling" (Bloomberg BNA Pension & Benefits Daily, June 24, 2015).

Session Two will convene from 10:00 am EST to 11:15 am EST live this Thursday. If you cannot make it in real time, the event can be downloaded for later viewing. It is the second event of four CPE-qualified events. Speakers will examine risk management for retirement plans from both a governance and economics perspective. Topics to be discussed include the following:

  • Current usage of derivatives by retirement plans for hedging purposes;
  • Financially engineered investment products and governance implications;
  • Fiduciary duties relating to monitoring risks and values of derivatives and structured products; and
  • Suggested elements of a Risk Management Policy Statement.

Join us for this talk about an important issue - risk management for retirement plans!

ERISA Litigation and Investment Monitoring

Please save the date for an educational program entitled "Life After Tibble: Investment Monitoring and Litigation Defense Considerations for ERISA Fiduciaries." Produced by Bloomberg BNA, this webinar event will take place on December 3, 2015. Speakers are listed below:

  • James O. Fleckner, Esquire - Chair - ERISA Litigation, Goodwin Procter LLP;
  • Dr. D. Lee Heavner - Managing Principal, Analysis Group, Inc.; and
  • Dr. Susan Mangiero - Managing Director, Fiduciary Leadership, LLC.

In the aftermath of the U.S. Supreme Court "Tibble" decision, there are numerous questions as to what exactly comprises effective investment monitoring from a procedural prudence perspective. Given the newness of this important legal decision and little formal guidance from the High Court, the panel will present economic perspectives about what ERISA fiduciaries should do to assess, and possibly improve, their current investment monitoring process. Attention will be paid to related topics that include the delegation of investment monitoring to third parties (such as advisors, asset managers and consultants) and the kinds of information that should be communicated to plan participants about investment monitoring activities. The role of the economic expert and the factors that need to be considered in estimating damages will be addressed, along with a discussion of available industry resources. The panel will use examples from casework to illustrate some of the key points.

Further details will be posted shortly.

Investment Fiduciary Monitoring, Economic Damages and Tibble

Following the publication of "An Economist's Perspective of Fiduciary Monitoring of Investments" by yours truly, Dr. Susan Mangiero (Pensions & Benefits Daily, May 26, 2015), I decided to write a second article on the topic as there is so much to say. This next article is co-authored with Dr. Lee Heavner (managing principal with the Analysis Group) and continues the discussion about investment monitoring from an economic viewpoint. Entitled "Economic Analysis in Fiduciary Monitoring Disputes Following the Supreme Court's 'Tibble' Ruling" (Pensions & Benefits Daily, June 24, 2015), we address the case-specific nature of investment monitoring by fiduciaries and the complexities of quantifying possible harm "but for" alleged imprudent monitoring.

Noting the discussion of changed circumstances by the High Court as part of its Tibble v. Edison International decision, it is imperative to understand that investment monitoring involves multiple steps, each of which takes a certain number of days to complete. "In the world of dispute resolutions, every complaint, expert report, and decision by a trier of fact is specific to a date or period of time. Time is no less a crucial variable with regard to the creation and implementation of an adequate investment monitoring program." While "changed circumstances" are likely to vary across plans and plan sponsors, exogenous events can spur further monitoring. "The departure of a key executive, a large loss, or a government investigation for malfeasance are a few of the events that may lead plan fiduciaries to subject an investment to enhanced scrutiny."

The expense of monitoring is another issue altogether, one that is nuanced, important and necessary to quantify. We point out that (a) there are different types of costs (b) expenses occur at different points in time and (c) some costs may be difficult to assess right away. "For example, when monitoring leads to a change in vendor or investment that in turn results in participant confusion, blackout dates, account errors, or a lengthy delay in setting up a new reporting system, the true costs may not be known until well after the transition is completed."

There are no freebies. There is a cost to taking action as the result of monitoring. There can be a cost to inaction as well. Investment selection and investment monitoring are different activities. Categories of investment monitoring costs include: (a) use of third parties (b) search costs (c) change costs and (d) opportunity costs. Any or all of these categories may come to bear in a calculation of "but for" economic damages. As a result, "there may be substantial variation to when prudent fiduciaries would act let alone how long it would take an investment committee to complete each action." An assessment of economic damages - whether for discovery, mediation, settlement or trial purposes - requires care, consideration and an understanding of the complex investment monitoring process.

For further insights and to read about this timely topic, download our article by clicking here.

An Economist's Perspective of Fiduciary Monitoring of Investments

I am delighted to share my recent article with readers of this pension blog. Entitled "An Economist's Perspective of Fiduciary Monitoring of Investments" (by Dr. Susan Mangiero and published in Bloomberg BNA Pensions & Benefits Daily, May 26, 2015), I wrote this article in the aftermath of the May 18 Tibble v. Edison decision by the U.S. Supreme Court.

A central thesis is that "ongoing oversight is an exercise in risk management" and that "[r]isk management is a never ending process." The article emphasizes the importance of (a) examining multiple risk factors and not relying on performance numbers alone (b) understanding the presence of financial leverage (should it exist) (c) clarifying the role of a service provider when an outside party is used and (d) letting participants know about the type of monitoring being done by an investment committee.

The topic of this article readily lends itself to at least one lengthy book as there is a considerable amount to say. I am co-writing a sequel article with fellow economist, Dr. Lee Heavner.

If you are interested in discussing investment fiduciary monitoring as relates to trustee training, compliance or dispute resolution, please email contact@fiduciaryleadership.com.