Love What You Do and Do What You Love

We are movie aficionados in our family and try to see a variety of celluloid offerings, as time permits. We recently had the pleasure of seeing an uplifting motion picture entitled St. Vincent. Bill Murray plays a grumpy man who, at first glance, seems unlikely to warm any hearts. Over time, however, the audience learns that he is a good guy, a war hero and a kind person. He befriends the little boy who moves in next door and, no surprise, inspires smiles all around. At the end of the film, as the credits roll, there is a scene where Bill Murray is enjoying a quiet moment in his modest backyard, singing along to Bob Dylan's "Shelter From The Storm." Maybe because the song is lyrical or people were curious about the scene, they stayed and listened.

Although Bob Dylan was a musician from an earlier generation, he remains an admired talent and is recognized for his vast body of work. According to an October 2014 Rolling Stone article, Dylan is so prolific that The Lyrics: Since 1962 includes nearly one thousand pages and weighs "approximately 13 and a half pounds." In his early 70's, he is still giving live concerts.

There is something magical about being excited about music, friends, work and play. Famed author Ray Bradbury who died a few years ago at age 91 was quoted as saying "Love what you do and do what you love."

I certainly enjoy the challenges of providing forensic economic analyses and investment risk governance consulting. Colleagues and attorneys I know (some of whom are clients) often say that they are proud to be making a difference. That purpose and excitement about time well spent applies to others I know who are far removed from law or business. One friend (now sadly deceased) used to find great pleasure in selling office supplies and being able to interact with her customers.

Though it did not generate box office mojo, "Hector and the Search for Happiness" made the point that the pursuit of happiness may be trumped by the happiness of pursuit. Inspired by a book with the same title and authored by Francois Lelord, a French psychiatrist, the film referenced the mind-brain link of living a life with joy. It turns out that anyone with access to a computer can now take "The Science of Happiness," courtesy of the University of California - Berkeley and professors from the Greater Good Science Center.

Whether you are heading towards retirement or solidly part of the workforce, keep Bobby McFerrin's words in mind. "Don't worry, be happy." It's a good way to live life.

Happiness and the Bottom Line

In case you missed it, March 20, 2014 was International Happiness Day. Sponsored by the United Nations International, the Day of Happiness is a reminder that there are lots of good things in this world and a moment of reflection is a nice way to celebrate our gifts. Interestingly and not surprising, eighty-seven percent of people who took the online poll at www.dayofhappiness.net say that happiness trumps wealth. Is this bad news for the financial community? No it is not and here's why.

Research studies repeatedly link emotional well-being with economic productivity. In his informative book entitled "What Happy Companies Know: How the New Science of Happiness Can Change Your Company for the Better," Dr. Dan Baker (with Cathy Greenberg and Collins Hemingway) extols the virtues of businesses that recognize the importance of motivating workers with carrots and not sticks. By extension, happy workers will remain employed and their incomes typically rise as they carry out their duties with a smile. This is great news for the advisers who want to help those with money to invest.

Happiness is certainly a big business. A quick search of Amazon.com for books on this topic yields nearly 40,000 results. There's even a magazine called Live Happy. One of my favorite tee shirt companies is called Life is Good. You can watch "The Economics of Happiness" documentary and follow along with a study guide.

Some people keep a gratitude journal. Setting aside a few minutes of quiet time is likewise popular. ABC reporter Dan Harris must have struck a nerve as his book about meditation is a best-seller. Click to learn more about his 10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-Help That Actually Works -- A True Story.

As readers of this blog know. I am a devotee of yoga and try to take a class whenever I can. My reasons include a desire to be fit and numerous advantages of taking deep breaths and focusing on the moment. The boost to concentration levels, especially for challenging projects, is a significant plus. The medical community continues to pay attention to the benefits of mindfulness. In late 2013, Bloomberg wrote about Harvard Medical School researcher, Dr. John Denninger, and his research about yoga, brain activity and immune levels. Since six to nine out of ten visits to see a doctor are cited as stress-related, costing companies roughly $300 billion per year, his federally-funded science can be helpful indeed to both individuals and employers. See "Harvard Yoga Scientists Find Proof of Mediation Benefit" by Makiko Kitamura (Bloomberg, November 21, 2013). Also check out "Take a Deep Breath," posted on the American Institute of Stress website.

Have a good day!