Working With Financial and Fiduciary Experts

I am delighted to join the panel about how to work with financial and fiduciary experts on ERISA (and more broadly, investment management) cases. This panel, entitled "Expert Coordination: Working With Financial and Fiduciary Experts," is part of the upcoming 7th National Forum on ERISA Litigation. Produced by the American Conference Institute, this Chicago event will run from April 28 to April 29, 2014. I will speak from 10:45 am to 11:35 am on April 29, 2014. See below for more details.

Many ERISA litigators will admit that the quality and communication skills of an economic expert can greatly impact the outcome of a case. Getting the right expert(s) in place sooner than later can be a distinct advantage. When that does not occur, important items may be excluded from discovery or pre-motion analysis. This panel will focus on the challenges associated with tight client budgets, working with multiple experts, knowing when to bring an expert(s) on board and evaluating how much information to share.

Fiduciary Duty is More Than Numbers

As a published author, I am constantly assessing what has appeal to readers. I try to write about topics that are relevant and timely and welcome feedback. Click here to send an email with your suggestions. As a financial expert, I continuously seek to stay on top of what is being adjudicated. As a risk manager, I regularly evaluate what might have been done differently when things go seriously awry.

What I have noticed is that enumeration seems to offer comfort. Lists of this or that are common to many best-selling books and widely read articles. A trip to the Inc. Magazine website today illustrates the point. Consider this excerpted list of lists:

The popularity of laying out "to do" items extends to the retirement industry as well. For example, Attorney Mark E. Bokert provides insights in his article entitled "Top 10 ERISA Fiduciary Duty Exposures - And What to Do About Them" (Human Resources - Winter Edition, Thomson Publishing Group, 2007). His list of vulnerabilities - and prescriptive steps to try to avoid liability - includes the following:

  • Identify who is a fiduciary and making sure that they are properly trained;
  • Create a proper process by which investments are selected and monitored;
  • Monitor company stock in a 401(k) plan and consider whether to appoint an independent fiduciary;
  • Assess the reasonableness of "like" mutual funds versus existing plan choices;
  • Ensure that communications with plan participants are adequate;
  • Undertake a thorough assessment of vendors and review their performance thereafter;
  • Assess whether 401(k) deferrals and loan repayments are being made in a timely fashion;
  • Identify the extent to which service providers enjoy a float and whether they are entitled;
  • Understand what is allowed in terms of providing investment advice to participants and abide by the rules accordingly; and
  • Critically evaluate whether auto enrollment makes sense and the nature of any default investment selection.

One could easily break out each of the aforementioned items into sub-tasks and create appropriate benchmarks to ascertain whether fiduciaries are doing a good job. Indeed, ERISA attorneys are the first to invoke the mantra of "procedural process" as a cornerstone of this U.S. federal pension law. Importantly however, relying only on numbers is not sufficient. Increasingly legal professionals and regulators are asking that process be demonstrated and discussed. Expect more of the same in 2013. Analyses and expert reports may be deemed incomplete if they do not include a deep dive of the fiduciary decision-making process that took place (or not as the case may be).

Financial Model Mistakes Can Cost Millions of Dollars

 

It's been awhile since I've blogged. Work has been busy and then I took off ten days to visit Paris. The City of Lights is amazing indeed. Now that I'm back, I will try to blog more frequently. There is certainly no shortage of topics about risk, governance, litigation, valuation and so on.

For those who don't know, I created a sister blog a few months ago. See GoodRiskGovernancePays.com. Nearly all of the time, the posts on each blog are different. However, I decided to reprint a post from GoodRiskGovernancePays.com here since the topic is hugely important. After all, for those defined benefit and defined contribution plans that are exposed to "hard-to-value" investments, leverage and perhaps higher than expected volatility, model risk could be the hidden alligator that bites if left unchecked. As always, I welcome your comments at contact@fiduciaryleadership.com.

Here is the post that was originally posted on June 2, 2011 by Dr. Susan Mangiero.

In a recently published article about financial models entitled "Financial Model Mistakes Can Cost Millions of Dollars" (American Bar Association, Section of Litigation, Expert Witnesses, May 31, 2011), Dr. Susan Mangiero defines model risk and explains why it is so important. Referencing the recent $242 million enforcement action by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission as a result of model mistakes made by a well-known asset management firm, this financial expert cites the heightened regulatory and litigation imperatives with respect to risk and valuation models. She concludes the article by listing some of the ways to mitigate risk. These include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Hire knowledgeable programmers with capital market experience;
  • Create and follow a set of policies and procedures that govern how and who will validate financial models over time and what will trigger revisions in a model(s);
  • Avoid conflicts of interest that would reward managers for ignoring problems and would potentially preclude an independent and objective assessment of problems and related corrective action(s);
  • Test assumptions for validity in stable markets as well as extreme circumstances;
  • Stress a model using a sufficient number of economic scenarios to gauge its predictive power and whether results can be relied upon in both good or bad times;
  • Educate personnel about how a particular model is supposed to work;
  • Establish a response strategy should a problem occur and investors need to be informed before things get out hand;
  • Scrap models that are overly complex and expensive to replicate;
  • Don't be afraid to ask questions about inputs, data quality, results, and concerns; and
  • Invite informed outsiders to offer an independent and regular critique on a confidential basis.