Pension Risk Management for Retirement Plans

I'm delighted to work with the Professional Risk Managers' International Association ("PRMIA") in delivering four (4) educational webinars about retirement plan risk management. According to its website, PRMIA is a "non-profit professional association" with forty-five chapters in various countries around the world. Click to download the PRMIA brochure for more information about membership. I hope you will join us in February and March for what should be an exciting and timely quartet of live events. If you cannot attend in real time, the webinars will be archived for later use. See below for details.

           Lead Instructor: Dr. Susan Mangiero, AIFA®, CFA®, CFE, FRM®, PPC™

                               Thursdays from 10:00 - 11:15 am EST / 3:00-4:15 GMT
                                       February 23 | March 2 | March 9 | March 16

                                                     A Virtual Training Series

This series consists of four webinar lectures, each one delivered with the goal of providing actionable information that can be used by the audience right away.

With approximately $100 trillion in global assets under management, retirement plan fiduciaries and their attorneys and advisors face numerous challenges in the aftermath of the worldwide credit crisis that began in 2008. Market volatility, investment complexity and compliance with new accounting standards and government mandates, alongside a strident call for better accountability and transparency, are a few of the pain points that keep pension executives up at night. Litigation and regulatory investigations are on the rise. As a result, enlightened pension decision-makers are turning their attention to risk management technology and techniques as a way to mitigate economic, legal and operating trouble uncertainties. Those who ignore the adverse impact of longer life spans, statutory capital requirements, binding financial statement reporting rules and broader fiduciary duties are destined for trouble. In some countries, trustees may be personally responsible for poor plan governance and may have to pay participants from their own pockets.

Who Should Attend

This series should be of interest to a broad range of financial and legal professionals since poor governance and/or too few resources being devoted to pension risk management within a fiduciary framework can (a) force benefit cutbacks for participants (b) lead to a ratings downgrade which increases a sponsor’s cost of capital (c) force a plan sponsor to come up with millions of dollars (pounds, euros, etc.) in cash for contributions (d) result in a costly lawsuit and/or regulatory enforcement (e) thwart a merger, acquisition or spin-off and/or (f) cause a sponsor to be out of compliance with financial and statutory reporting requirements.

Both senior-level decision makers and staff members can benefit from viewing this series of webinar lectures. Representative titles of likely audience members include: • Directors of the board • CFOs, treasurers, controllers and VPs of finance • Members of a sponsor’s pension investment committee • Pension consultants • Pension advisors • Pension and securities attorneys • Pension and securities regulators • Rating analysts • Financial journalists • Derivatives traders • Executives with derivatives and securities exchanges • ERISA, municipal and sovereign bond and D&O liability insurance underwriters • International, U.S. federal and state lawmakers • Think tank researchers • Industry associations • Chambers of Commerce in various countries • Economists who cover demographic patterns and • Risk management students.

Session One (February 23, 2017): Establishing Risk Management Protocols for Defined Benefit Plans and Defined Contribution Plans

Session One examines risk management for retirement plans from both a governance and economics perspective. Topics to be discussed include the following:

  • Procedural prudence and the costs of ignoring fiduciary risk;
  • Risk management differences by type of retirement plan;
  • Industry norms and pitfalls to avoid;
  • Role of Chief Risk Officer, investment committee members and in-house staff; and
  • Suggested elements of an Investment Policy Statement.

Session  Two (March 2, 2017): Use of Derivatives in Pension Plans

​Session Two looks at how derivatives are used by retirement plans, whether directly or indirectly. Topics to be discussed include the following:

  • Current usage of derivatives by retirement plans for hedging purposes;
  • Financially engineered investment products and governance implications:
  • Fiduciary duties relating to monitoring risks and values of derivatives; and
  • Suggested elements of a Risk Management Policy Statement.

Session Three (March 9, 2017): Liability-Driven Investing and Other Types of Pension Risk Transfer Strategies

Session Three examines the reasons why the number of pension restructuring deals is on the rise, especially in the United States and the United Kingdom, and the type of transactions being done. Topics to be discussed include the following:

  • Nature of the pension risk transfer market and various approaches being utilized;
  • Regulatory considerations for fiduciaries in selecting an annuity provider;
  • Action steps associated with implementing a pension risk transfer; and
  • Case study lessons learned.

Session Four (March 16, 2017): Service Provider Due Diligence

Session Four looks at the growth in the Outsourced Chief Investment Officer (“OCIO”) and Fiduciary Management markets and explains service provider risk. Topics to be discussed include the following:

  • Fiduciary considerations of delegating investment responsibilities to third parties;
  • Risk mitigation practices for selecting and monitoring vendors such as asset managers and advisors;
  • Types of lawsuits that allege fiduciary breach on the part of third parties and related regulatory imperatives; and
  • Identifying warning signs of possible vendor fraud.

Fee: Fee includes access to all four live sessions (75 minutes each), access to the recorded session for 60 days, and digital program materials.

  • Sustaining Members: $355.00
  • Contributing Members: $395.00
  • Free/Non-Members: $465.00

Registration: You may register for this course by clicking on Register at the bottom of the page. For questions regarding registration please contact PRMIA at training@prmia.org.

Cancellation: A refund (less a 15% administration fee) will be made if formal notice of cancelation is received at least 48-hours prior to the date of the first session. We regret that no refunds will be made after that date. Substitutions may be made at no extra charge.

Important Notice: All courses are subject to demand. PRMIA reserves the right to cancel or postpone courses at short notice at no loss or liability where, in its absolute discretion, it deems this necessary. PRMIA reserves the right to changes or cancel the program. PRMIA will issue 100% of registration refund should cancelation be necessary.

CPE Credits: This webinar series qualifies for 6 CPE credits subject to certain rules about required attendance. Email webinars@prmia.org for more information about obtaining continuing education credits.

About the Presenter:

Dr. Susan Mangiero is a forensic economist, researcher and author. With a background in finance, modeling and investment risk governance, Susan has served as an expert on numerous civil, criminal and regulatory enforcement actions involving corporate retirement plans, government retirement plans, hedge funds, private equity funds, foundations and high net worth individuals. She has been engaged by various financial service organizations to provide business intelligence insights about what institutional investors want from their vendors. As founder of an educational start-up company, Susan raised capital from outside investors, created a fiduciary-focused content library and developed a governance curriculum for institutional investors and their advisors. Prior to her doctoral studies, Susan worked at multiple bank trading desks in the areas of fixed income, foreign exchange, interest and currency swaps, financial futures, listed options and over-the-counter options.

Susan Mangiero is a managing director with Fiduciary Leadership, LLC. She is a CFA® charterholder, Professional Risk Manager™, certified Financial Risk Manager®, Accredited Investment Fiduciary Analyst®, Certified Fraud Examiner and Professional Plan Consultant™. Her award-winning blog, Pension Risk Matters®, includes nearly 1,000 essays about investment risk governance and has well over a million views. She is the creator and primary contributor to a second blog about investment compliance at www.goodriskgovernancepays.com. Susan is the author of Risk Management for Pensions, Endowments and Foundations. Her articles have appeared in multiple publications such as RISK Magazine, Bloomberg BNA Pension & Benefits Daily, Corporate Counsel, American Bankruptcy Institute Journal, Mergers & Acquisitions, Business Valuation Update, CFO Magazine and the Journal of Corporate Treasury Management.

Susan has testified before the ERISA Advisory Council and a joint meeting of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (“OECD”) and the International Organisation of Pension Supervisors (“IOPS”). She lectured at the Harvard Law School and addressed groups such as the American Institute of CPAs (“AICPA”) – Employee Benefits Section, Financial Executives International, and the National Association of Corporate Directors. She can be reached at contact@fiduciaryleadership.com or followed on Twitter @SusanMangiero.
 

Fiduciary Certification and Training

Last week, I had the pleasure of speaking to Dr. Anna Tilba with the Newcastle University Business School in the United Kingdom ("UK"). A mutual colleague had suggested we speak since we both work in the governance area. Dr. Tilba has studied the fiduciary practices of investment intermediaries. Her report fed into the UK's Law Commission publication about current fiduciary standards and areas for improvement.

One of the topics that arose during our conversation was the need for adequate fiduciary education and what she referred to as the professionalism of investment stewards. I agree that having experienced and knowledgeable individuals in place is critical. Even if the intent is to outsource certain services to others, investment committee members are tasked with making an informed decision about what to delegate and to whom.

Stateside, the U.S. Department of Labor ("DOL") continues its Fiduciary Education Campaign. Each seminar covers topics such as those listed below:

  • Comprehend the nature of each ERISA plan offered;
  • Apply rigor in selecting and monitoring service providers; and
  • Steering clear of prohibited transactions.

DOL website visitors can access something called the ERISA Fiduciary Advisor for information and answers to questions about duties. It's a tool that should help beginners although the DOL cautions that content is not "intended to be a substitute for the advice of a retirement plan professional."

So far, there is no uniform set of answers to questions such as the following:

  • How should in-house fiduciaries be selected?
  • How should in-house fiduciaries (individually and as a group) be assessed in terms of demonstrating procedural prudence?
  • Should in-house fiduciaries receive a bonus for achieving certain plan-specific goals?
  • Does everyone on an investment committee need to be equally proficient in a particular subject area or should someone serve as a Sarbanes-Oxley type of "financial expert?" 
  • Do in-house fiduciary term limits make sense?
  • How do variables such as plan design and characteristics of the workforce impact the kind of fiduciary education needed?
  • How should training differ for small to medium sized plans as addressed by the "Report of the Working Group on Fiduciary Education and Training?"

The good news is that data exists to benchmark myriad types of retirement plan decisions in terms of process and not just outcomes. Furthermore, there is a large array of training opportunities. Click here to download the "Retirement Plan Professional's Designation & Certification Guide" to learn about several dozen available offerings. Note that this document has a 401k focus. The bad news is that not all programs are created equal in terms of topic coverage. Even if they were sufficiently similar, facts and circumstances for a given retirement plan often dictate the need for specialized training not required elsewhere. 

Although fiduciary training is uneven across plans, sponsors and geographic location, I predict that lawmakers here and outside the United States will eventually impose universal certification requirements for retirement plan fiduciaries. I don't think a "one size fits all" approach to fiduciary training is ideal but political pressures will almost surely prevail. As the collective pension crisis worsens (and I acknowledge that lots of plans are in great shape), participants and taxpayers will want to know who was in charge of troubled schemes and how they made decisions. Proverbial heads tend to roll when voters' wallets shrink.

Pension Fiduciaries - Time to Wake Up and Smell the Coffee, Part One



Today's post and the next few that follow focus on pension governance (the name of our new website and a term that is often used to describe fiduciary duties and best practices). For a discussion of what pension governance means, click here to read interviews with market leaders. It's such an important topic yet often overlooked. In fact, the U.S. Department of Labor created an educational program ("Getting It Right") in order to help individuals understand their duties. (The results of countless audits apparently left examiners nervous about the folks who did not properly self-identify as fiduciaries.)

"Hot off the press" is a set of standards devoted to the topic of pension governance. Newly published by the Stanford Law School, the so-called Clapman report urges pension funds, endowments and charitable funds to adopt principles that reflect prudence, ethics and transparency. Citing some big dollar "no-no's" on the part of institutional decision-makers, chief architect of the report, Peter Clapman,and others rightly point out that giant institutions must walk the walk if they admonish corporations to do the same. CEO of Governance for Owners USA and former chief investment counsel of TIAA-CREF, Clapman adds that “Bad governance also weakens funds by eroding public support for them." One element of the report calls for funds to provide clear (and make public) information about governance rules.

Yippee Yahoo!

A few of us sometimes feel as if we've been screaming in the wind about the urgent need to know who is in charge and how they are running the show. (I'm sure Clapman and others would agree.) To read how bad things are in terms of NOT being able to easily identify where the buck stops, check out "In Search of Hidden Treasure." More than a year ago, I wrote "that a systematic identification of who does what and why with respect to employee benefits is simply not a reality as things stand today. This makes it difficult (perhaps impossible) to effect change."

The Clapman Report suggests that funds hire "trustees who are competent in financial and accounting matters." Read "Practice What You Preach" for our list of basic questions about pension fiduciary selection, training and performance evaluation. Anecdotally, I've often queried trustees and  other types of fiduciaries - "How do you become and stay a fiduciary? Do you take a quiz? Do you possess a certain amount of relevant experience? Do you get paid what you're worth in terms of liability exposure and hours spent on plan-related tasks?"

Scary to say, selection is frequently a function of who is seen as having a few hours of free time. Unfortunately, being a plan fiduciary is arguably a full-time job. Moreover, with so many complex decisions to make, someone with a limited background in topics such as investing may truly struggle to understand basics, let alone nuances of evaluating risk-adjusted return expectations. Even when an external consultant is used, a fiduciary still retains oversight responsibilities (a topic deserving of its own separate post).

Another proffered recommendation from the Clapman Report is to "establish clear reporting authority between trustees and staff" and to "define appropriate responsibilities and delegation of duties among fund trustees, staff, and outside consultants." We couldn't agree more. Check out our earlier discussion about the importance of incentives in "Paper Clip Theory of Pension Governance."

One thing is clear. Pension governance is starting to attract attention. That's great news for the many fiduciaries already doing things the right way. (You deserve recognition.) For those who need to improve, perhaps the spotlight on practices, good and bad, will encourage change. That would be a huge plus for plan beneficiaries, taxpayers and shareholders.

Here are a few resources for interested readers.

1. Committee on Fund Governance: Best Practice Principles -"Clapman Report" (Stanford University)

2. Prudent Practices for Investment Stewards (Fiduciary 360, AICPA, Reish Luftman Reicher & Cohen)

3. Asset Manager Code of Professional Conduct (CFA institute)

4. Standards of Membership and Affiliation (The National Association of Personal Financial Advisors)

5. CFP Certification Standards (Financial Planning Standards Board)

6. Regular Member Code of Ethics (National Investor Relations Institute)

7. Code of Professional Responsibility (Society of Financial Service Professionals)

8. Also check the site for the Financial Planning Association. I understand that they are soon to release a new set of standards for financial advisors.