Five Retirement Fiduciary Events That Made a Big Difference in 2016

Kudos to Chris Carosa for his continued efforts as publisher of Fiduciary News. I share his mission to educate and provide independent insights. That is why I was delighted to be one of the contributors to his recent article, "These Five Developments Dramatically Changed the Retirement Fiduciary World in 2016."

My view is that it is hard to pinpoint standalone issues. So many areas overlap. For example, a discussion about fiduciary litigation frequently involves questions about the reasonableness of fees. A conversation about fees often means talking about asset allocation as well. An analysis of asset allocation trends is commonly linked to investment performance realizations. When one talks about returns, it is usually in the context of economic forecasts. Overlay regulatory mandates, including the imminent U.S. Department of Labor Fiduciary Rule, and it becomes apparent that retirement plan governance is complex territory. Nevertheless, Chris did a noble job of listing significant and distinct trends with his readers. His list includes the following:

  • Capital Markets - Low interest rates continue to challenge both institutional and individual investors. The pension risk transfer market is experiencing unprecedented growth as sponsors seek to focus less on retirement plan management and more on operating their core businesses. Post-election, the U.S. market seems poised for better returns in 2017 although it is thought that low-cost index funds will remain popular.
  • Excessive Fee Litigation - The attention paid to fee levels and the process of assessing reasonableness continues to grow. Some believe that the proliferation of lawsuits has resulted in improved governance regarding the selection and review of various funds. I am quoted as saying that "...investors in search of turbo-charged performance struggled with the reality that the costs of alternatives, derivatives and structured products are generally higher than passive funds."
  • Fiduciary Rule - Uncertainty is the watchword with multiple plan sponsors unsure about what they might want to delegate to a third party. Consulting firms that offer independent fiduciary services have an opportunity to help their clients solve real compliance problems.
  • State Sponsored Private Employee Retirement Plans - Deemed controversial by some, these arrangements to help small business employees are being rolled out by states throughout the nation. The goal is to encourage savings over the long-term although I have doubts about accountability and redress for disgruntled participants. Click to read "State Retirement Arrangements for Small Business Employees" (June 9, 2016) and "Public-Private Retirement Plans and Possible Fiduciary Gaps" (June 5, 2016).
  • Presidential Race - Carosa writes "Of all the events of 2016, nothing will have had more of an impact than the presidential election." Perhaps he is correct. Already the yearend markets have been chugging upward and optimism is on the rise. Yet there are questions about whether regulations such as the Fiduciary Rule will be weakened or perhaps eliminated altogether. Should that occur, financial service industry executives will need to respond.

The article lists other developments including restructuring deals. I am quoted as saying "Restructuring deals have made 2016 a notable year in terms of the number of pension risk transfers and the outsourcing of the responsibilities of a Chief Investment Officer to a third party. Bankruptcy has catalyzed the restructuring of multiple plans, much to the dismay of the savers who have been asked to accept lower benefits. Service providers who have been ordered by the courts to take less favorable terms as swap counterparties or consultants are correspondingly glum."

President John F. Kennedy declared "Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future." I concur. Where there is disruption, there is always the opportunity to address a problem and win the hearts and wallets of investors.

Here's to a terrific 2017. Happy holidays!

Surveys Highlight Importance of Fiduciary Focus When Hiring Advisors

According to an August 17 press release from Fidelity Investments, "fiduciary responsibility tops plan sponsors' reasons for hiring advisors." What's more, this poll of nearly 1,000 defined contribution plan decision-makers makes clear that knowledgeable third parties have an edge in being hired and retained, especially if they can offer input about plan design and investment selection. Cited areas of concern include the following:

  • Increasing employee participation;
  • Properly measuring investment performance; and
  • Making sure that investment risk goals are heeded.

A 2016 Mass Mutual survey reveals similar findings that plan sponsors want help with plan design, discharging fiduciary duties and investment selection. Moreover, about two-thirds of respondents said they want an advisor who works with companies like theirs. 

It's no surprise then that educational initiatives continue to develop in response to changing regulations and an enhanced focus on fiduciary duties. As announced last month, the American Retirement Association has partnered with Morningstar "to develop a fiduciary education and best practices program for advisors."

April 2017 will be a busy month for many as they seek to comply with large chunks of the U.S. Department of Labor Fiduciary Rule.

More About the Fiduciary Gap

Thanks to the many people who shared their insights about various state retirement arrangements for eligible private company employees and the need for a proverbial umbrella to address the fiduciary gap.

Let me start with the Nutmeg State program since I discussed it in two earlier posts. Interested parties can click to download the final legislation that sets up the Connecticut Retirement Security Exchange. (Note the new name.) Several changes caught my eye.

  • On page 156 of 298, there is a provision that "If a participant does not affirmatively select a specific vendor or investment option within the program, such participant's contribution shall be invested in an age-appropriate target date fund that most closely matches the participant's normal retirement age, rotationally assigned by the program." If "rotationally" means "random," it will be helpful to know how board members identify age cohorts and select (and monitor thereafter) a particular product for each group.
  • Regarding a provision that allows the sitting governor to individually select the board chair without the advice and consent of the General Assembly, a best practice is that the engagement process be transparent. Interested parties want to know that the appointment reflects the right person for the job
  • It would be helpful to know the basis for why the voluntary opt-in for small businesses with more than five employees was removed. After all, forced regulation could end up costing firms so much in terms of paperwork and payroll set-up that hiring plans are put on hold.
  • It would be helpful to know how the three percent default contribution level will be tracked so that legislators will know whether to seek an increase later on. It's a low number, especially given the math for what can be done privately. Suppose a person makes $50,000 per year in wages. The three percent deduction translates into $1,500. In 2016, the IRA contribution limit for someone younger than fifty years is $5,500. Should an individual decide to allocate the maximum, participation in the state program will logically require that the individual go elsewhere to invest the additional $4,000. Why doesn't that individual simply invest the full $5,500 with one reputable organization? I assume the counter argument is that an individual who would not max the annual IRA limit needs a nudge in the form of the state program.

As I wrote in "State Retirement Arrangements for Small Business Employees," there are multiple state endeavors and one would need to examine the details of each one to assess economic impact and pension governance implications. Questions about federal programs exist as well. Putting aside dire long-term projections about the U.S. Social Security Trust Fund, absent reforms, several critics are unhappy with what they see as a fiduciary gap for anyone enrolled in the myRA program. By way of background, there are no fees to the individual enrollee. This is good but the guaranteed return is low because it is tied to federal debt security yields. For June 2016, the number is 1.875 percent APR. There is a lifetime maximum of $15,000 for eligible persons. A person's employer must agree to facilitate automatic deductions which means you must be employed.

One attorney I called today said he did not think there is a fiduciary in place for this federal product. Chris Carosa, editor of Fiduciary News, has another take. In "Does "myRA breach fiduciary duty?" he lays out reasons why he thinks the myRA product is "blatantly ill-suited for retirement savers." He decries the "oozing irony" of political leaders who want the Fiduciary Rule applied to others but not to themselves, adding there is no diversification potential and the selling firm (i.e. the U.S. Treasury) is conflicted by distributing its own product. Another retirement industry professional wants to know "What fiduciary would MANDATE that a twenty-five year old invest his or her retirement assets in a short to intermediate term government bond fund and expect to avoid liability?

You get the picture. We need to understand where the fiduciary gaps exist and then strive to close them as quickly and efficaciously as possible.

Susan Mangiero, PhD Joins Financial Women's Association Panel About Fiduciary Rule

Dr. Susan Mangiero will join a panel of esteemed experts to talk about the U.S. Department of Labor's Fiduciary Rule on June 21, 2016. Sponsored by the Financial Women's Association, New Jersey chapter, CPE credit is available (CLE credit is pending). Meeting at the Seton Hall School of Law in Newark, this timely event features the following speakers:

  • Gregory F. Jacob, Esquire - Moderator - Former Solicitor of the U.S. Department of Labor, Partner in the Washington, DC office of O'Melveny & Myers and a member of the Financial Services and Labor and Employment Practices;
  • Susan Mangiero, PhD and Accredited Investment Fiduciary Analyst - Panelist - Forensic economist, investment risk governance expert and author/researcher with a focus on ERISA and non-ERISA fiduciary best practices;
  • Kathleen M. McBride, AIFA - Panelist - Founder of The Committee for the Fiduciary Standard and The Institute for the Fiduciary Standard, a nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank dedicated to providing research, education and advocacy on the fiduciary standard's impact on investors, the capital markets and society; and
  • Margaret Raymond - Panelist - Vice President of T. Rowe Price Group, Inc. and T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc. and managing counsel with a focus on legal matters relating to retirement savings, including ERISA fiduciary principles and other retirement plan administration topics.

 Some of the many topics to be addressed include the following:

  • Features of the Fiduciary Rule and how different market segments are likely to be impacted;
  • Past, present and future characteristics of the IRA marketplace;
  • Use of robo advisors;
  • Product availability and asset allocation, post regulation; and
  • Legal challenges being filed to forestall the implementation of the DOL Fiduciary Rule.

For further information and to register, click here. A special thanks to Dr. Dubravka Tosic and Attorney Gregory Jacob for putting this event together and arranging for continuing education credit.

Note: Prior to June 21, it was decided to reschedule this event in the fall of 2016.

Hard to Value Assets, Hedge Funds and Investment Fiduciaries

As I have pointed out on multiple occasions, valuation is an integral part of investment risk management for several reasons. First, fees paid to asset managers are frequently linked to performance and performance calculations depend on reported values. If values are artificially inflated, returns are likely to be inflated as well. Second, imprecise values can skew asset allocation decisions, lead to hedges being too big (or too small) and possibly cause an investor to breach trading limits that are part of an Investment Policy Statement. It's no surprise then that valuation process questions about who does what, when and how continue to surface.

According to a May 9 Wall Street Journal article, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") is investigating "the way hedge funds value their thinly traded holdings and how they respond when investors ask for their money back." The SEC has been vocal about its concerns regarding asset valuations for awhile. In December 2012, Bruce Karpati, then Chief of the Asset Management Unit of the SEC Enforcement Division (and now in private industry), talked about a focus "on detecting fraudulent or weak valuation practices - including lax valuation committees and the use of side pockets to conceal losing illiquid positions - and the failure to follow a fund's stated valuation procedures." Click to read "Enforcement Priorities in the Alternative Space." (As an aside, some hedge funds buy and sell actively traded securities for which there is a ready market and full price transparency.)

The U.S. Department of Labor ("DOL") regularly broadcasts its concerns about "hard to value" assets, including financially engineered products that show up in certain defined benefit and defined contribution retirement plans. In September of 2008, I spoke before the ERISA Advisory Council, by invitation, to address valuation issues from the perspective of a trained appraiser and fiduciary best practices expert. Click to read "Testimonial Remarks Presented by Dr. Susan Mangiero." I talked at length about valuation questions to ask of service providers and procedural prudence considerations for institutional investors.

A few weeks ago, senior attorney Fred Reish addressed monitoring and uncertainty in his April 19, 2016 newsletter. He directed readers to Fiduciary Rule preamble text that urges an advisor and his financial institution to install an adequate monitoring process before recommending "investments that possess unusual complexity and risk, and that are likely to require further guidance to protect the investor's interests." Click to read "Interesting Angles on the DOL's Fiduciary Rule #1." It doesn't take a rocket scientist to conclude that a "complex" and "risky" investment could be hard to value and not particularly liquid. (I have purposely not defined the terms in quotes herein as they are often related to facts and circumstances for a particular investor.)

Expect to read more about this important topic of valuation, especially as applied to those investors in search of higher returns. In a "no free lunch" world, risk and return go hand in hand. It's not necessarily a bad thing to take on greater risk as long as there is an understanding at the outset as to what gives rise to uncertainty and how risks are being mitigated.

Fiduciary Rule and Small Businesses

Given the newness of the U.S. Department of Labor ("DOL") Fiduciary Rule, many still have questions about both content and implementation. One such inquiry arose during a workshop I was asked to create for members of the CT chapter of the National Institute of Pension Administrators ("NIPA"). During our discussion, an audience member wondered out loud if small businesses would be sufficiently overwhelmed that they decide to jettison plans to offer benefits to employees. The reasoning is that compliance costs could dwarf any perceived upside associated with creating retirement arrangements for workers.

As we celebrate National Small Business Week from May 1 through May 7, 2016, the issue of disproportionate impact is certainly relevant. As with any regulation, there are winners and losers. Critics have been vocal about what they see as flaws. Last June, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce released a report entitled "Locked Out of Retirement: The Threat to Small Business Retirement Savings" that predicted a fallout for small business owners who "provide roughly $472 billion in retirement savings for over 9 million U.S. households" via SEP and SIMPLE-type IRA plans. Its author, Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP attorney Bradford Campbell, wrote that "Main Street advisors will have to review how they do business, and likely will decrease services, increase costs, or both." As the U.S. Department of Labor Fact Sheet points out, the final rule covers IRAs, 401(k) plans and many other types of employee benefit plans, some of which were already regulated pursuant to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974.

Talk about deja vu. Investment News just published an article about the Fiduciary Rule effect on small broker-dealers as relates to documentation and other elements of compliance. The author, Attorney Ross David Carmel, worries that the DOL Fiduciary Rule could be catnip to the plaintiffs' bar because it is vague, "with no definition of best interest or reasonable compensation." He adds that increased costs will likely be passed along to consumers. Of course, buyers of any services have the right to decline or go elsewhere if competitors are willing to sell.

Only time will tell how things materialize for companies that rely on IRAs and will therefore be impacted by the Fiduciary Rule. In aggregate, economic consequences could be large if small business compliance hits the bottom line hard. Statistics from the U.S. Small Business Administration website show that 28 million small businesses contribute 54 percent of U.S. sales.

April is Financial Literacy Month

Every year, April brings spring showers and a celebration of Financial Literacy Month. Instead of balloons and party favors, the Council for Economic Education launched a video campaign of famous people who explain "what they've learned about the importance of financial literacy and saving." Given the dismal outlook of retirement readiness, any effort to get people thinking about putting money aside for the future is a good thing.

According to the 2016 Retirement Confidence Survey, roughly one of every five individuals expects to postpone retirement for monetary reasons. Insured Retirement Institute research suggests that "less than a quarter of baby boomers, 24 percent, are confident they will have enough savings to last throughout their retirement years."

The extent to which the recently released U.S. Department of Labor Fiduciary Rule will impact savings patterns is unknown at this time. Certainly the goal is to empower individuals to plan ahead.

National Institute of Pension Administrators Workshop About Fiduciary Issues

In a few weeks, on April 27, Dr. Susan Mangiero will address the Connecticut chapter of the National Institute of Pension Administrators ("NIPA"). The educational workshop entitled "Impact of Final DOL Fiduciary Regulation" will address topics such as service provider due diligence and plan participant communication from an economic perspective. Interested persons should email clawton@retirewelltpa.com with questions or to register.

According to the NIPA website:

"The National Institute of Pension Administrators (NIPA) is a national association representing the retirement and employee benefit plan administration profession. It was founded with the idea of bringing together professional benefit administrators and other interested parties to encourage greater dialogue, cooperation and educational opportunities. NIPA’s goal is to improve the quality and efficiency of plan administration.

From its beginning in 1983, the founding concepts and specific purpose of NIPA is to educate and train plan administrators. NIPA started as an outgrowth of an eight person work study group. It is now a 1000-member national organization. NIPA's educational forums include courses, workshops and seminars focusing on the various aspects of plan administration."

We hope to see you there. 

Fiduciary Rule: Instant Gratification or Panic

If you haven't viewed Tim Urban's TED Talk about procrastination, I urge you to do so when you have a short break. He spins a tale of prioritization woe by referencing different parts of our brain. There is the Instant Gratification Monkey who tries to lure the Rational Decision-Maker from productive endeavors. This playful little fella holds sway until deadlines force the appearance of the Panic Monster. Someone then responds by pulling an all-nighter or two until the next crisis. As this illustrator and Wait But Why blog site co-founder explains, it's not an enjoyable way to manage tasks and seldom generates good results. It is far better to prepare in advance and schedule "must do items" accordingly.

Occasionally, planning ahead is difficult. Other times, it is easy. As Mr. Urban illustrates during his fifteen minute "eat your peas" presentation, there are signposts that indicate when acceleration is required. In his case, it was the appearance of his photo and bio in a TED Talks program that gave a date certain he could not ignore. For investment professionals who anticipate the eventual passage of the U.S. Department of Labor Conflict of Interest Proposed Rule into law, it is clear that significant change is afoot. Even if the exact final language or timing is unknown today, fiduciaries (now and later) may not want to sit back and wait.

Already there is talk of increased delegation to organizations that are willing to serve as either an ERISA 3(21) or 3(38) fiduciary, acknowledging that nothing eliminates risk completely. As Pension Resource Institute CEO Jason Roberts opines in an Investment News interview, "...while these offerings can limit fiduciary responsibility for advisers at the plan level, advisers could still be exposed at the participant level."

Others advance the idea that the so-called fiduciary rule will catalyze creative problem-solving, especially in the technology area, and that smart money is on first movers. See "Fiduciary Rule May Spur Product Innovation" by Andrew Welsch (Financial Planning, March 16, 2016). If you missed my earlier posts on this topic, see "Retirement FinTech Gets Another Suitor - Goldman Sachs" and "Financial Technology and the Fiduciary Rule."

Whatever path is decided on will require a minimum amount of time for contracting and setting up operations. Starting late could be costly for everyone involved. Lest you figure out a way to be able to succumb to the Instant Gratification Monkey (unlikely in the case of regulations and rules that require sufficient compliance), now is a good time for procrastinators to address priorities. Expending time right away may not be fun but is nonetheless necessary.

Retirement FinTech Gets Another Suitor - Goldman Sachs

No sooner had I written "Financial Technology and the Fiduciary Rule," an invitation to the Future of Finance 2016 appeared in my in-box with the call-out that "Technology is about to revolutionise financial services." (Note the British spelling for this Oxford conference.) Based on session titles, attendees will hear about topics such as how technology can:

  • Be "used to build trusting relationships with clients" and increase transparency;
  • Substitute for "expensive human intermediaries" to lower costs; and
  • Encourage the creation of "simpler and cheaper" insurance and savings products.

Increasingly, angels and venture capitalists are waking up to the fact that the global retirement marketplace is big and ripe for innovation. Earlier today, Goldman Sachs Investment Management Division announced its intent to acquire Honest Dollar. According to CrunchBase, this transaction follows a seed financing last fall to further build a web and mobile platform that allows small businesses to cost-effectively set up retirement plans. Expansive Ventures led that round that includes former Citigroup CEO Vikram Pandit and will.i.am, founder of The Black Eyed Peas musical group.

Yet another indication that investors see "gold in them thar health care and retirement plan hills" is a $30 million capital raise for a company called Namely. Its February 23, 2016 press release lists Sequoia Capital as the lead venture capital firm for this round, bringing its total funding so far to $107.8 million for this "SaaS HR platform for mid-market companies."

Interestingly, in articles about both Honest Dollar and Namely, the tsunami of complex regulations is cited as a reason why employers need help from financial technology organizations. With mandates growing and becoming more muscular, no one should be surprised if cash-rich backers write big checks to financial technology businesses. As Xconomy reporter Angela Shah points out, multiple start-ups are "trying to compete for the 80-plus percent who don't offer benefits."

There is no doubt that the competitive landscape is changing and will prompt more strategic soul-searching for vendors and policy-makers alike. I've listed a few of the many questions in search of answers as things evolve.

  • Will other large financial service organizations like Goldman Sachs swallow up smaller start-ups? If so, does that change the role of angels and venture capitalists?
  • If enough of these companies pop up to serve small businesses and self-employed persons, is there still a need for the product offered by the U.S. government - myRA?
  • Will the U.S. Department of Labor fiduciary rule, if passed into law, accelerate the formation and growth of financial technology companies? If so, how?
  • Will there be a need for more or fewer financial advisors as the financial technology sector grows?
  • Will individuals buy more insurance and savings products? If not, why not?

Life in financial services land will never be dull.

Financial Technology and the Fiduciary Rule

Whether the proposed U.S. Department of Labor so-called fiduciary rule becomes law this year remains to be seen. Many in the industry think its passage is nigh. Critics hope for a reprieve, asserting that costs are likely to outweigh benefits.

One oft-repeated concern is that small savers will be harmed if financial service companies decide to jettison accounts that fall below target asset levels. The Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association ("SIFMA") explains "Because they cannot afford a fiduciary investment advisory fee, they will instead be forced to solely rely on a computer algorithm known as a 'robo-advisor.'"

Financial technology enthusiasts will counter that a more automated approach to retirement planning is a good thing for big and small savers alike. Certainly the topic merits review for at least two reasons.

  • The use of machines has exploded in recent years. In her November 9, 2015 speech about technology, innovation and competition, U.S. Securities and Exchange ("SEC") Commissioner Kara Stein foretells buoyant growth with an expected $2 trillion in assets under management by robotized advisors by 2020.
  • There are central questions about the fiduciary obligations of a company that concentrates on algorithmic advising and money management. Besides seeking to contain model risk, there is a need, at a minimum, for a vendor to regularly review client objectives and constraints. Click here to access a white paper on this topic by National Regulatory Services.

A few weeks ago, a handful of venture capitalists and prominent angels announced a $3.5 million capital round for a financial technology company called Captain401. Its stated goal is to help small businesses streamline the creation and administration of 401(k) plans that the founders argue would be too expensive to offer without automation. A cursory review of the company website makes it impossible to know much about its business model, technology safeguards or compliance infrastructure. Nevertheless, the funding of this and other "Fin Tech" organizations augurs favorably for added growth in this area.

As the global retirement marketplace adapts to regulatory and economic realities, it will be interesting to watch (or perhaps lead) what unfolds in terms of innovation, service provider competitiveness, cost tiers and other outcomes that impact savers and those who have already retired.

Investment Management and Stress

The fact that some people thrive on stress could be a plus if you want to work in the financial services industry. According to "The most (and least) stressful jobs in banking and finance" (efinancialcareers.com, December 31, 2015), careers that were ranked as most stressful to least stressful are as follows:

  • Investment banker;
  • Trader;
  • Risk management and compliance;
  • Wealth management/private banker;
  • Institutional sales;
  • Management consulting;
  • Private equity;
  • Equity research;
  • Fund manager; and
  • Accounting.

Interviews with recruiters and employees mentioned long hours and a lack of control over issues that create problems and demand solutions. Respondents who work in the risk management and compliance areas talked about their frustration when they call out areas in need of improvement but then "nothing is done." 

Other professionals, such as those who work in wealth management, talked about competition as being a source of stress. Making money only occurs after an advisor expends considerable effort to build a big client base but then more time is needed to prevent an aggressive peer from taking assets away.

Besides job-specific concerns, industry changes can be a source of worry if they are expected to radically transform the way business is conducted. Consider the rise of financial technology ("FinTech") or what Inc. Magazine referred to as "One of the Most Promising Industries of 2015." According to a recent Wall Street Journal article entitled "Can Robo Advisers Replace Human Financial Advisors?", assets managed without human intervention grew from $3.7 billion to $8 billion between July 2014 and July 2015. Although critics counter that robots cannot offer individualized advice about specialties such as estate planning, a reliance on automation, if substantial, will result in winners and losers.

Regulatory changes can raise stress levels too, especially if one has little latitude to adapt to a new rule at the individual level. The U.S. Department of Labor's proposed fiduciary rule is already showing up in the form of strategic corporate decisions that are moving people from one place to another. This week's announcement about a sale of MetLife's U.S. advisor unit to the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. comes on the heels of the American International Group's decision to sell its broker-dealer unit rather than potentially incur added compliance costs. See "MetLife exits brokerage business as DOL rule looms" (Investment News, February 29, 2016).

Although not specifically mentioned in articles about stressful jobs, ERISA retirement plan fiduciaries are surely aware of their personal and professional liability exposure. Add the complexities of new legislation and economic challenges such as negative interest rates and it's not a stretch to understand why some fiduciaries might need to take a few deep breaths to relax. No doubt their public pension colleagues may need a zen moment as well.

February 2 Hearing On New Fiduciary Bill

Grab the popcorn. At 10 am EST on February 2, 2016, the Education and Workforce Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives will live stream its hearing on H.R. 4293, the Affordable Retirement Advice Protection Act. Click here to access the website if you want to watch the hearing in real time. Click here to download the text of H.R. 4293.

The event promises to be lively. Already, industry whisperers portend an expedited 50-day review by the Office of Management and Budget ("OMB") instead of its customary 90 days of this well-watched legislation. (The U.S. Department of Labor ("DOL") sent its Conflict of Interest Rule - Investment Advice, Regulation Identifier Number ("RIN") 1210-AB32, last week.) Click here to download various proposed text.

Some still question the costs associated with compliance. According to "Bills to Replace DOL Fiduciary Rule to Get Marked Up on Tuesday" by reporter Melanie Waddell (Think Advisor, January 29, 2016), the U.S. Chamber of Commerce would like the OMB to ask DOL to rethink its economic analysis of the rule's impact. Stephen Ellis with Morningstar estimates that adhering to the fiduciary standard could cost $2.4 billion or twice the "$1.1 billion price tag" that shows up in official studies. See "Morningstar Details DOL Impact" (Think Advisor, February 1, 2016).

Others think this new mandate, if passed into law, is long overdue. Read "Fiduciary rule could make 2016 good for investors" by Mark Miller (Reuters, January 7, 2016).

Whatever happens tomorrow, there are more headlines to follow.

Santa Claus and the Fiduciary Standard

At this time of the year, when Santa Claus is making his list of who has been naughty and nice, optimists rub their hands in glee, anticipating a stocking full of goodies. Pessimistic believers resign themselves to something worse. In pension land, if you embrace fiduciary change, the incoming head of the U.S. Senate Finance Committee may be about to hand you the proverbial lump of coal.

According to Washington Bureau Chief Melanie Waddell, Senator Orrin Hatch intends to push anew for the passage of his Secure Annuities for Employee Retirement or "SAFE" Act. He spoke about pension reform and the "pension debt crisis" on July 9, 2013 in his "Introduction of the SAFE Retirement Act of 2013."  His objective is to "stop the Department of Labor from writing fiduciary rules for individual retirement accounts" and "over-regulating IRA investment advice." See "Sen. Hatch's 2015 Priority: Torpedo DOL Fiduciary Efforts" (Investment Advisor Magazine, December 15, 2014).

Put forward as a Conflict of Interest Rule-Investment Advice, the U.S. Department of Labor seeks to "reduce harmful conflicts of interest by amending the regulatory definition of the term 'fiduciary' set forth at 29 CFR 2510.3-21(c) to more broadly define as fiduciaries those persons who render investment advice to plans and IRAs for a fee within the meaning of section 3(21) of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) and section 4975(e)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. The amendment would take into account current practices of investment advisers, and the expectations of plan officials and participants, and IRA owners who receive investment advice, as well as changes that have occurred in the investment marketplace, and in the ways advisers are compensated that frequently subject advisers to harmful conflicts of interest."

As with any mandate, if approved, some will be impacted more than others. In its "DOL 2014 Fall Regulatory Agenda," ERISA attorneys Fred Reish, Bruce Ashton and their Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP colleagues assert that broker-dealers and their registered representatives will likely bear the brunt of new rules. They write that "Adoption of an expanded definition will likely affect both the status for broker-dealers as fiduciaries and their compensation (due to the fiduciary prohibited transaction rules of ERISA). In response, these broker-dealers may need to develop RIA fiduciary programs for advisors who focus on retirement plans and decide how to manage the plan business of those who do not."

Whatever your holiday preference may be, keep a look out for the "gifts" that 2015 has in store for plan sponsors and their service providers.