Golf Course RFPs and Other Mistakes That Retirement Plan Fiduciaries Make

Litigation attorney and uber ERISA blogger, Steve Rosenberg, recently shared his slide deck entitled "Common Mistakes of Plan Sponsors."  Part of an educational presentation to U.S. Department of Labor examiners, Steve addressed the importance of getting competitive bids, thoroughly investigating service providers before selecting one or more individuals or firms and avoiding what he coins the "Golf Course RFP." He worries that members of a retirement plan investment committee could bypass best practices in selecting a bank, advisor, consultant, third party administrator and/or asset manager and instead rely too much on a vendor's brand name or overly friendly relationship with someone who works at a company before considered. Deciding to hire someone on the basis of a handshake over a glass of beer or chatting on the greens is ill-advised if it shortcuts proper research about the abilities of a service provider, fees they intend to charge and whether their offerings are likely to meet the needs of a particular defined contribution or defined benefit plan.

Steve warns about other mistakes to avoid, including the identification of who will do what tasks, how often they will be performed and whether a service provider contracts to be a fiduciary. In particular, he frets that members of an ERISA plan committee may select a provider to serve as an investment fiduciary and then incorrectly assume that they have passed the baton and no longer have any liability.

Other errors he cites are part of what he calls the "ESOP Private Company Valuation Problem." These concerns include "insufficient reliance on outside experts" and not hiring an independent fiduciary to oversee a transaction when there are clear conflicts of interest or further expertise is needed.

Interested readers may want to investigate the following educational resources to include:

New RFP Template to Select and Monitor 401(k) Plan Vendors

In June 2012, the Association for Financial Professionals (AFP) debuted its Request for Proposal (RFP) template to "help treasury and finance professionals evaluate 401(k) plan service providers." Developed in response for help in selecting vendors who provide products and services to companies that sponsor defined contribution benefit plans, the detailed guide considers numerous facets of the purchasing process.

Dr. Susan Mangiero, CFA, certified financial risk manager and Accredited Investment Fiduciary AnalystTM served as a member of the drafting committee. Click here to purchase a copy of the 401(k) Service Provider RFP template.

CFO Liability and Pension Plan Governance and Risk Management

On October 16, 2012, thousands of CFOs,Treasurers, Vice Presidents of Finance and other corporate leaders will meet in Miami, Florida for a chance to attend timely and informative sessions as part of this year's annual conference of the Association for Financial Professionals ("AFP"). Dr. Susan Mangiero is proud to have been selected to speak at the Association for Financial Professionals' big event. She will be joined by senior ERISA litigation attorney Howard Shapiro with Proskauer Rose LLP to address the topic of CFO liability and pension plan governance and risk management. Click to access information about the Pension & Benefits educational session track that includes this important session and many others.

According to Dr. Susan Mangiero, a managing director with FTI Consulting's Forensic and Litigation Consulting practice and based in New York, financial professionals, board members and their advisors can learn numerous lessons by examining what went wrong elsewhere and, by extension, what to avoid. Mangiero emphasizes that "Litigation is a reality. Mitigating enforcement, regulatory, litigation and reputation risk is hugely important because of the expensive consequences of inaction. For enlightened companies both large and small, employee benefit plan governance is high on the priority list for officers and directors. When retirement plan problems exist, it could compromise a firm's ability to raise capital, finalize corporate finance transactions and/or add to enterprise value. Most importantly, it could mean that a company is unable to keep its promises to plan participants."

Dr. Mangiero is also the author of "Pension risk, governance and CFO liability" (Journal of Corporate Treasury Management, Henry Stewart Publications, Vol. 4, 4, 2012, pages 311 to 323). Click to read "Pension risk, governance and CFO liability."

Click to read "The Risk Manager" by Elliot A. Fuhr and Christine Wu McDonagh (FTI Journal, April 1, 2012) for a current discussion about the importance of having chief financial officers embrace and support enterprise risk mitigation.