ERISA Litigation Conference Addresses Timely Fiduciary Issues

Dr. Susan Mangiero announces the sponsorship of a forthcoming conference about ERISA litigation and regulatory issues by Fiduciary Leadership, LLC. Produced by the American Conference Institute ("ACI"), this mid-April event pairs attorneys (including corporate counsel) with jurists to address timely topics that include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Excessive fees;
  • Church plan lawsuits;
  • Fiduciary liability insurance;
  • Use of independent fiduciaries;
  • Enforcement risk;
  • Ethics;
  • Employee Stock Ownership Plan ("ESOP") litigation;
  • Proceedings related to company stock in ERISA plans; and
  • Health care mandates and related compliance.

Interested readers of www.goodriskgovernancepays.com or www.pensionriskmatters.com can read more about the program, speakers and venue by downloading the ERISA litigation conference brochure. There is a $200 discount off the current price for any blog reader who calls 888-224-2480 or visits http://www.americanconference.com/ERISA.

I look forward to seeing you in the Windy City in a few weeks. With the just announced push by the White House for fiduciary conflict of interest rules, U.S. Supreme Court activity in Tibble v. Edison International and news of multi-million ERISA litigation settlements, this conference is expected to be informative and important.

Working With Financial and Fiduciary Experts

I am delighted to join the panel about how to work with financial and fiduciary experts on ERISA (and more broadly, investment management) cases. This panel, entitled "Expert Coordination: Working With Financial and Fiduciary Experts," is part of the upcoming 7th National Forum on ERISA Litigation. Produced by the American Conference Institute, this Chicago event will run from April 28 to April 29, 2014. I will speak from 10:45 am to 11:35 am on April 29, 2014. See below for more details.

Many ERISA litigators will admit that the quality and communication skills of an economic expert can greatly impact the outcome of a case. Getting the right expert(s) in place sooner than later can be a distinct advantage. When that does not occur, important items may be excluded from discovery or pre-motion analysis. This panel will focus on the challenges associated with tight client budgets, working with multiple experts, knowing when to bring an expert(s) on board and evaluating how much information to share.

Fiduciary Management For Pension Plans

Besides being knowledgeable about medicine, nutrition and state-of-the-art health research, my doctor has a great sense of irony. He says things that make me laugh out loud. When I saw him recently, I mentioned how much I was enjoying reruns of some older television shows like Quincy, M.E. He replied, in typical clever fashion, "yea, but Sam did all the work and Quincy took the credit." It struck a chord because his statement is mostly true. In case you never watched the popular series about a coroner who helps the police solve crimes, veteran actor Jack Klugman (now deceased) applies Criminal Scene Investigation ("CSI") like smarts and tenacity in pursuit of justice. Sam Fujiyama (played wonderfully by actor Robert Ito) is likewise a medical doctor. He works alongside Dr. Quincy and is portrayed as an integral part of uncovering the truth.

In pension land, it is often the case that sponsors think they have hired someone to play the role of helpful Sam. The notion is that the advisor, consultant or fund of funds professional will be paid a fee to carry out a certain level of due diligence about action items such as setting up or revising an appropriate investment strategy, selecting or terminating an asset manager, redesigning a plan or evaluating pension transfer structures. Once the engagement letter is signed and a retainer fee is in place, the plan sponsor, like Dr. Quincy, can breathe a sigh of relief. Help is supposedly on the way - maybe. The safety net concept attached to bringing a third party on board, combined with what a colleague of mine describes as fiduciary fatigue, is reflected in the global growth of firms that describe themselves as fiduciary managers. While the retirement plan regulatory regime varies by country, the investment outsourcing model is gaining sway in the United States, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and elsewhere. The undeniable trend to delegate merits discussion.

Before employers get too comfortable and think that their pension problems now belong to someone else, it is noteworthy to acknowledge that there are more than a few lawsuits that have been filed against third parties. Some of them allege breach on the basis of a failure to properly oversee and respond accordingly.

My observations come from firsthand experience. I have served as an economic analyst or testifying expert on disputes between an institutional investor such as a retirement plan, endowment, foundation or family trust. For other matters, I have provided due diligence training to fiduciaries and board members or reviewed the risk practices in place prior to a vendor being selected or as part of a later review of said vendor, once hired. As the founder of an educational start-up company a few years ago, I had a front row seat to the ongoing discussions between buyers and sellers of investment, risk and valuation services. Information in the form of repeated and in-depth surveys and numerous conversations about what pensions, endowments, foundations, family offices and other types of trust investors want and need from those who provide advice is telling. One issue that came up often from institutional investors was how to benchmark the quality of the work being provided by a delegate. This is a critical subject, especially for those outsourced professionals who are doing a terrific job and want their clients to be satisfied.

The topic of service provider due diligence is timely, important and the focus of my presentation on October 25, 2013 as part of the American Conference Institute's 6th Annual ERISA Litigation Conference. Interested readers are welcome to download my fiduciary due diligence slides.