Public Pension Plans Owe $2.73 Trillion

According to a just released study by the Pew Center on the States, state pension plans in aggregate owe nearly $3 trillion in pension benefits, of which about $400 billion is unfunded. Unfortunately, for some state residents, the financial pain is not evenly spread throughout the nation. Consider some of the findings.

  • "Only a third of the states have consistently set aside the amount their own actuaries said was necessary to cover the cost of promised benefits over the long term.
  • Twenty states had funding levels of less than 80 percent at the end of FY 2006—below what most experts consider healthy.
  • Several states have seen particularly troubling drops in their pension funding levels. Some of the biggest drops have occurred in Hawaii, Kentucky, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Washington."

Hold onto your hats.

The study further reports that post-employment healthcare benefits have a price tag of about $381 billion with only 3 percent of this total liability having been funded to date. "None of the five largest states—California, Texas, New York, Florida and Illinois—had put aside money for non-pension benefits as of FY 2006." and 11 states, including California, New York, New Jersery and Connecticut owe more than $10 billion to plan participants.

Ouch!

As this blog has pointed out repeatedly, there is no free lunch. Putting off the inevitable is going to be painful for employees, retirees and taxpayers.

Now imagine you are a resident of a state with post-employment funding woes. Your taxes go up to pay for someone else to retire at the same time that you are struggling with your own situation. That's exactly what is happening for millions of people, causing great angst for all.

Read "Promises with a Price" in full text. If you missed it, the October 2007 issue of Governing (by the same authors of this new Pew report) addresses anemic pension governance standards at the state level in "The $3 Trillion Challenge." Part of that article includes a sidebar with yours truly on suggested questions to ask as part of a governance check-up for a particular plan. Read the Q&A with Susan Mangiero.

Also check out our earlier blog post entitled "Tea Party Redux: State Pensions in Turmoil." Written a year ago, the message is still the same. Ask your state legislators for their proposed solution to the retirement funding crisis.