Alternatives and Retail Retirement Account Owners

The prospect of being part of millions of retail retirement plans has some financial advisors and hedge fund managers giddy with excitement. The 401(k) market alone is huge. According to the Investment Company Institute, as of Q3-2012, these defined contribution plans held an estimated $3.5 trillion in assets. In 2011, over fifty million U.S. workers were "active 401(k) participants." This compares favorably to an approximate $2.66 trillion hedge fund market size in 2013, up from $2.3 trillion one year earlier. Private equity, real estate and infrastructure comprise the rest of the alternatives investment sector according to a press release issued by Preqin, a financial research company. See "Alternative Assets Industry Hits $6tn in AUM for First Time" (January 21, 2014).

CNBC contributor Shelly K. Schwartz explains that alternative investment strategies are appearing in the form of 400 plus mutual funds and exchange-traded funds ("ETFs") that employ "complex trading strategies" such as managed futures, long/short trading in stocks and multiple currency exposures. Allocating to leveraged loans, start-up ventures and global real estate are other ways that these relatively new funds seem to be mimicking the approach taken by hedge funds and private equity funds that traditionally have catered to institutional investors and high net worth individuals. Notwithstanding regulatory differences relating to diversification, percentage of "illiquid" investments, redemption, daily pricing and how much debt can be used to lever a portfolio, statistics suggest a growing interest on the part of smaller investors to get in on the action. See "Seeking safe havens? Analysts, advisors point to liquid alternative funds" (November 24, 2013). Also check out "Goldman pushes hedge funds for your 401(k)" (Fortune, May 22, 2013) in which reporter Stephen Gandel describes new funds being offered by various financial institutions, some of which invest in mutual funds that mimic hedge fund investing strategies and others that invest in hedge funds directly.

Not everyone is an ardent fan. In "FINRA warns investors on alternative mutual funds," Reuters reporter Trevor Hunnicutt (June 11, 2013) describes regulators' concerns that "not all advisers and investors understand the risks involved," especially with respect to whether a retail-oriented fund is truly liquid. In its "Alternative Funds Are Not Your Typical Mutual Fund" publication, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority ("FINRA") cautions investors to assess investment structure, strategy risk, investment objectives, operating expenses, the background of a particular fund manager and performance history.

Given the ongoing search for the next big thing, we are likely to see a lot more activity in the alternative investments marketplace - for both institutional and high net worth clients as well as for individuals with modest wealth levels. PensionRiskMatters.com will return to this topic in future posts. There is much to write about with respect to fiduciary implications, risk management and valuation.

In the meantime, I want to thank ERISA attorney David C. Olstein with Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP & Affiliates for apprising me of a 2012 U.S. Department of Labor grant of individual exemption for Renaissance Technologies, LLC ("Renaissance").  Described as a "private hedge fund investment company based in New York with over $15 billion under management" by HedgeCo.net (September 26, 2013), Renaissance holds a large number of equity positions in stocks issued by household name companies. Click to see a recent list of their transactions. The "Grant of Individual Exemption Involving Renaissance Technologies, LLC," published in the Federal Register on April 20, 2012 makes for interesting reading for several reasons. First, it describes policies relating to important topics such as valuation, redemption and disclosures for "privately offered collective investment vehicles managed by Renaissance, comprised almost exclusively of proprietary funds" and the impact on retirement accounts in the name of Renaissance employees, some of its owners and spouses of both employees and owners. Second, as far as I know, there are not a lot of publicly available documents about proprietary investment products that find their way into the retirement portfolios of asset management firm employees and shareholders. Third, as earlier described, there is evidence of a growing interest on the part of the financial community in bringing hedge funds or hedge fund "look alike" products to the retirement "masses."

Dodd-Frank, Swaps Clearing and Compliance for Pension Plan Asset Managers

According to the Bank for International Settlements, the notional amount outstanding, as of June 2013, of global over-the-counter derivatives exceeded $692 trillion. Interest rate swaps reflect the largest category at about $425.6 trillion. Given the jumbo size of this market, it is no surprise that regulators have demanded more transparency about the mechanics of the global swaps market, including reporting to regulators and the public dissemination of reported information. It is also no surprise that regulators have demanded what they deem to be risk-reducing measures such as the clearing of these instruments and collateral collection. With the promulgation of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank”), numerous market participants are now required to clear their swaps. Click here to learn about the three categories of organizations that are required to adhere to swap clearing and trade execution requirements under Section 2(h) of the Commodity Exchange Act (“CEA”). Given the complexity of the prevailing swaps-related rules and regulations as well as the evolving nature of these mandates, any educational insights are welcome.

As an economic consultant, trainer and expert witness who regularly does work in the pension risk management arena and author of Risk Management for Pensions, Endowments and Foundations, I was delighted to have a chance to get comments about this important topic of swaps clearing and trade compliance from Davis Polk attorneys Lanny A. Schwartz and Gabriel D. Rosenberg. Mr. Schwartz is a partner, and Mr. Rosenberg is an associate in Davis Polk’s Trading and Markets practice. Besides the questions and answers provided below, and acknowledging that there is a lot to learn about swaps-related compliance, readers may want to download "Are You Ready? New Swap Trading Requirements For Pension Plan Asset Managers" (August 2013) by Attorneys Schwartz and Rosenberg, in conjunction with BNY Mellon.

Question: What is your motivation for writing about this topic as well as offering educational webinars?

Answer: We continue to receive numerous inquiries from swap market participants, many related to clearing. Swaps dealers were the first to have to demonstrate compliance with Dodd-Frank's swaps clearing mandate in March of last year. Most asset managers were required to clear specified types of interest rate swaps and credit default swaps as of June 2013. Other entities, including ERISA plans, had a deadline of September 2013.

Question: What areas have you identified as requiring more time and attention?

Answer: We are still mid-stream in terms of implementing a wide array of rules. Compliance is not a simple “check the box” exercise. Some swaps are now subject to mandatory clearing, but this is a relatively small part of the universe in terms of instruments traded in the market. Trading on a regulated futures exchange or swap execution facility is currently voluntary. Margin requirements are not yet final. Documentation requirements are similarly critical and require significant attention.

Question: What is a qualified independent representative and why is that important to an asset manager that has pension plan clients?

Answer: Before a swap dealer can act as an advisor to a pension plan regarding swaps, which in this context means making customized recommendations, the plan manager must verify that the pension plan has a qualified independent representative ("QIR") in place. A QIR is an agent of a Special Entity (such as a corporate or public pension plan) that is knowledgeable and independent of any swap dealer counterparty.

Question: It sounds like there is a large amount of due diligence that must be carried out by swaps dealers, asset managers and end-users such as pension plans, respectively. Would you elaborate?

Answer: You are correct that each category of swap market participant has a large amount of due diligence to carry out in order to ensure that they are compliant with Dodd-Frank's trading, clearing and other provisions. Swap dealers will generally require counterparties to adhere to one or more of the International Swaps and Derivatives Association (“ISDA”) protocols and other documentation as relevant to their activity. For example, suppose Big Bank X is a leading dealer of swaps and has been approached by Global Asset Management Firm Y to handle its trades on behalf of various end-users such as pension plans of Fortune 500 companies. Before Big Bank X will speak in detail about swaps with Global Asset Management Firm Y, it generally will need to make sure it has proper documentation in place. Unless Global Asset Management Firm Y can demonstrate adherence (or enters into alternative documentation developed by the swap dealer, Big Bank X will generally not transact with them.

Question: What are some of the action steps that a pension plan must take?

Answer: A pension plan, whether a corporate ERISA plan or government employee benefits plan, must have an account with a Futures Commission Merchant (“FCM”) in order to enter into swaps trades that are subject to clearing. This requires diligence and negotiation of important documentation about the clearing relationship. Pension plans should also consider the trade-offs between using swaps and nearly equivalent futures contracts.

Question: Are there areas of vulnerability that need to be better addressed?

Answer: A firm needs to have people in place who are experienced and knowledgeable about Dodd-Frank, operational processing, legal documentation and the use of technology for data inputting and report generation. None of these areas are trivial and require care and diligence. Additionally, since things are in flux as new rules are being adopted, it is critically important for any swap market participant to stay abreast of compliance mandates.

Question: Headlines are replete these days with news about regulatory investigations and lawsuits about how London Interbank Offer Rates (“LIBOR”) are determined by quoting banks. Inasmuch as the majority of swaps are tied to some type of LIBOR fix, how is swaps trading likely to be impacted?

Answer: The increased scrutiny about LIBOR could result in increased regulatory interest in other indexes that are referenced by swaps.

Question: What is the role of external counsel versus the internal General Counsel?

Answer: It is critical for asset managers to develop an educational program that allows front, middle and back office professionals to understand what rules, policies and procedures need to be established and followed. External counsel can add value by explaining the ISDA Protocols and other documentation and compliance requirements to clients. An end-user’s General Counsel should make sure that everything is in place in order to comply with Dodd-Frank. Plenty of clients say they don’t even know where to start and feel overwhelmed.

Question: There is so much more to discuss. Readers should stay tuned for further updates. At the client level, it sounds like you will both remain quite busy.

Answer: Susan, we appreciate the opportunity to share our insights with readers of your blog. We urge everyone with a stake in good governance to pay attention and do whatever is needed to comply with Dodd-Frank's swaps rules.

Muni Bonds, Pensions and Financial Disclosures: Compliance, Litigation and Regulatory Trends

Mark your calendars to attend "Muni Bonds, Pensions and Financial Disclosures: Compliance, Litigation and Regulatory Trends."

At a time when unfunded pension and health care obligations are accelerating the budgetary crisis for some municipalities, experts fear that current problems are the tip of the iceberg. A new focus on accounting rules, the quality of disclosure to muni bond investors and the due diligence practices of underwriters, portfolio managers and advisers could mean heightened liability exposure for anyone involved in the nearly $4 trillion public finance marketplace. Add the history-making Detroit bankruptcy decision to the mix and attorneys have the makings of a perfect storm as they attempt to navigate these unchartered waters. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has made no secret of its priority to sue fraudulent players in the public finance market. Insurance companies are reluctant to underwrite policies for high-risk government entities at the same time that municipal fiduciaries are more exposed to personal liability than ever before, especially as the protection of sovereign immunity is being challenged in court. Litigation that involves how much monitoring of risk factors took place is on the rise.

Public finance and securities litigation counsel, both in-house and external, can play a vital role in advising municipal bond market clients as to how best to mitigate litigation and enforcement risk or, in the event that an enforcement action has already been filed, how best to defend such litigation. Please join Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP partner, Elaine C. Greenberg, and retirement plan fiduciary expert, Dr. Susan Mangiero, for an educational and pro-active program about the complex compliance and litigation landscape for municipal bond issuers, underwriters, asset managers and advisers. Topics of discussion include the following:

  • Description of the current regulatory environment and why we are likely to see much more emphasis on the disclosure activities of public finance issuers and the due diligence practices of underwriters and advisers;
  • Overview of hot button items that impact a bond issuer’s liability exposure, to include valuation of underlying collateral, rights to rescind benefit programs in bankruptcy and the use of derivatives as part of a financing transaction;
  • Explanation of GASB accounting rules for pension plans and likely impact on regulatory oversight of securities disclosure compliance and related enforcement exposures;
  • Discussion about trends in municipal bond litigation – who is getting sued and on what basis; and
  • Description of pro-active steps that governments and other market participants can take to mitigate their legal, economic and fiduciary risk exposures.

Featured Speakers:

Ms. Elaine C. Greenberg, a partner in Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP’s Washington, D.C., office, is a member of the Securities Litigation & Regulatory Enforcement Group. Ms. Greenberg’s practice focuses on securities and regulatory enforcement actions, securities litigation, and public finance. Ms. Greenberg is nationally recognized for producing high-impact enforcement actions, bringing cases of first impression and negotiating precedent-setting settlements, she possesses deep institutional knowledge of SEC policies, practices, and procedures. Ms. Greenberg brings more than 25 years of securities law experience, and as a Senior Officer in the SEC's Enforcement Division, she served in dual roles as Associate Director and as National Chief of a Specialized Unit. As Associate Director of Enforcement for the SEC's Philadelphia Regional Office, she oversaw the SEC's enforcement program for the Mid-Atlantic region and provided overall management direction to her staff in the areas of investigation, litigation and internal controls. In 2010, she was appointed the first Chief of the Enforcement Division's Specialized Unit for Municipal Securities and Public Pensions, responsible for building and maintaining a nation-wide unit, and tasked with overseeing and managing the SEC's enforcement efforts in the U.S.’s $4 trillion municipal securities and $3 trillion public pension marketplaces. Ms. Greenberg recently gave a speech entitled “Address on Pension Reform” at The Bond Buyer’s California Public Finance Conference in Los Angeles on September 26, 2013.

Dr. Susan Mangiero is a CFA charterholder, certified Financial Risk Manager and Accredited Investment Fiduciary Analyst™. She offers independent risk management and valuation consulting and training. She has provided testimony before the ERISA Advisory Council, the OECD and the International Organization of Pension Supervisors. Dr. Mangiero has served as an expert witness as well as offering behind-the-scenes forensic analysis, calculation of damages and rebuttal report commentary on matters that include distressed debt, valuation, investment risk governance, financial risk management, financial statement disclosures and performance reporting. She has been actively researching and blogging about municipal issuer related retirement issues for the last decade. She has over twenty years of experience in capital markets, global treasury, asset-liability management, portfolio management, economic and investment analysis, derivatives, financial risk control and valuation, including work on trading desks for several global banks, in the areas of fixed income, foreign exchange, interest rate and currency swaps, futures and options. Dr. Mangiero has provided advice about risk management for a wide variety of consulting clients and employers including General Electric, PriceWaterhouseCoopers, Mesirow Financial, Bankers Trust, Bank of America, Chilean pension supervisory, World Bank, Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, RiskMetrics, U.S. Department of Labor, Northern Trust Company and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Dr. Mangiero is the author of Risk Management for Pensions, Endowments and Foundations  (John Wiley & Sons, 2005), a primer on risk and valuation issues, with an emphasis on fiduciary responsibility and best practices. Her articles have appeared in Expert Alert (American Bar Association, Section of Litigation), Hedge Fund Review, Investment Lawyer, Valuation Strategies, RISK Magazine, Financial Services Review, Journal of Indexes, Family Foundation Advisor, Hedgeco.net, Expert Evidence Report, Bankers Magazine and the Journal of Compensation and Benefits. Dr. Mangiero has written chapters for several books, including the Litigation Services Handbook and The Handbook of Interest Rate Risk Management.

Pension Liability Price Tag For Private Equity Funds and Their Investors

I have long maintained that any individual or organization that invests in a company needs to check under the employee benefits hood before allocating money initially, and regularly thereafter. I can give you countless examples where incomplete due diligence led to an overly rich acquisition or investment that resulted in a new owner having to deploy cash to write checks to retirees and/or incur the costs of restructuring an otherwise untenable situation.

Failure to carry out a comprehensive ERISA-focused due diligence of a target portfolio company is not good for numerous reasons. Having done economic analyses of companies with underfunded pension plans, I know firsthand that it is often a rude awakening for investors such as private equity funds when they are confronted with the reality that what they want and what they end up with in terms of buying forecasted growth are not always the same. Reasons to worry include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • A private equity fund may not be able to realize its target rate of return because a portfolio company cannot sufficiently grow without cash that is now redirected to support employee benefit plans.
  • A pension plan that has invested in said private equity fund will be none too happy if performance falls short of expectations, especially for something that arguably should have (and could have) been considered and addressed as part of the original deal.
  • An unhappy pension fund investor may turn around and sue a private equity fund for alleged failure to have properly researched "what if" situations, taken on "too much" risk and disclosed too little information. Litigation in turn can be an expensive proposition for a private equity fund, making it even more difficult to achieve even minimum hurdle rates.

The issue of private equity ownership and portfolio company pension liabilities was heavily discussed as the result of a 2007 Appeals Board of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation ("PBGC") decision about ownership, control and responsibilities for portfolio company pension plan gaps. In "Private Equity Funds: Part of the ERISA Controlled Group?" (December 19, 2007), O'Melveny & Myers LLP attorneys Wayne Jacobsen and Jeff Walbridge explained that "[i]f the PBGC's position endures, it could have significant ramifications for private equity fund investments in portfolio companies that sponsor defined benefit pension plans...[t]he fund could be required to use any or all of its assets, including the ownership interests of the fund in any or all of its portfolio companies, to fund the pension obligations of the bankrupt portfolio company."

Imagine the happy faces in private equity land when the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts opined on October 18, 2012 in favor of Sun Capital Partners III, LP and related parties. According to "Potential ERISA Title IV Liabilities of Private Equity Firms - Eliminated by the Sun Capital Decision?" (November 2012), Edwards Wildman attorney Mina Amir-Mokri describes the decision as a "significant victory for private equity firms" but explains that Sun Capital Partners v. New England Teamsters & Trucking Industry Pension Fund was to be appealed.

On July 24, 2013, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit reversed the earlier decision and put private equity funds in a potential liability position once again. According to "Private Equity Funds Further Exposed to Portfolio Company Pension Plan Liabilities" (July 29, 2013) Latham & Watkins attorneys Jed Brickner and Austin Ozawa offer post-opinion practical hints such as the need for private equity firms to "carefully consider how to structure their funds and acquisition structures to avoid characterization as a trade or business and avoid inclusion in the same controlled group as their portfolio companies." Additionally, they urge private equity funds to pay attention to the "structure of their funds' investments"...possibly "dividing their investment between two or more of independently managed funds with distinct portfolios to support a finding that no individual fund (or group of 'parallel' funds) controls any portfolio company (and no set of funds is treated as a joint venture). Paul Hastings attorneys Stephen H. Harris, Eric R. Keller, Ethan Lipsig and Mark Poerio assert that private equity funds would do well to own "less than 80% of a portfolio company"...perhaps via "thoughtful adjustments to ownership structures and management operations" that can help to reduce the exposure to portfolio company pension liabilities. See "Private Equity ERISA Alert: Consider ERISA Pension Liability Risks from Portfolio Plans" (July 2013).

While legal experts weigh in on the important issue of what responsibilities belong to private equity funds, if any, to portfolio company ERISA plan participants, institutional investors such as pensions, endowments, foundations and family offices - and their investment consultants and advisors - should take heed. If a private equity fund's exposure to a portfolio company with a problem pension plan ends up shrinking the wallets of institutional investors, serious questions will understandably be asked about who should have done what and when.

ERISA Assets: QPAM and INHAM Audit Legal Requirements and Best Practices

I am happy to announce that I will be joined by esteemed colleagues Howard Pianko, Esquire (Seyfarth Shaw) and Virginia Bartlett (Bartlett O'Neill Consulting) on September 10, 2013 from 1:00 to 2:30 pm EST to talk about QPAM and INHAM compliance audits. See below for more information. Click to register for this forthcoming educational event about ERISA requirements. (Note: I am given a few complimentary guest passes. Contact me if you are interested and they are still available.)

This CLE webinar will prepare counsel to advise asset manager clients regarding Qualified Professional Asset Manager (QPAM) and in-house asset manager (INHAM) audits as required by the Department of Labor. The panel will review the new exemption rules, who can conduct an audit, what the process entails, and how to showcase good practices with existing and prospective plan sponsors.

Continue Reading...

The Importance of Clear Communications

A funny thing happened the other day while having a snack in a Paris bakery. I am here for a few days, tagging along with my husband who is teaching for a month. Shortly after we sat down, a Japanese family arrived, went to the counter and asked in English for a sandwich to be heated before serving. As the woman at the cash register only spoke French, she did not respond right away. I think she was trying to understand what they wanted. The new arrivals asked again, in English and speaking a bit louder. Again, no reply. Then another customer, already seated and chatting with her friend, began speaking in Japanese to the family and subsequently translating into French for the bakery worker. As a result, the lady behind the counter was able to respond that they had no way to heat a sandwich and thereby allow the family to choose what they wanted to do as a result. Minutes later, four hungry customers were enjoying cold bread and hot beverages, with gratitude for the translator all the way around.

My take away points from observing this encounter is that the world is getting smaller. Speaking a second language is a plus. When you cannot speak the "right" language, access to someone who can translate is an advantage. When individuals are not communicating, opportunity loss occurs. Had the friendly passerby who spoke Japanese and French not played an active role, a family would have gone hungry for awhile and the bakery owner would have lost a sale.

Applied to the investment industry, similar lessons exist.

Investors often complain that contracts with managers, brokers, advisors, insurance companies and other service providers are too complex to understand. The ambiguity or absence of clarity as to who should be doing what and in what manner typically shows up as part of a dispute resolution. Something has gone awry and one party is bringing action against the other, based on facts and circumstances that include each party's interpretation of words.

Complexity of a product or service is another consideration. In "Don't Make Investing Too Complicated" by Matthew Luke (The Motley Fool website, May 10, 2013), readers are urged to focus on companies with simpler business models. Luke writes that "The more complicated an investment however, the more things can go wrong." While his statement may not apply to all investors, there is merit for everyone in being able to identify risk factors that can potentially destroy value.

As an independent risk governance and prudence expert, I am often in the position of having to ask service providers and investors alike to tell me what risk factors they deem most significant as potential destroyers of long-term value. We then talk about the likelihood of something going wrong and how risks are being mitigated. Those conversations cannot take place if information is overly complicated and/or unclear.

In other situations, a "translator" such as an informed consultant or advisor can assist both managers and investors in closing a sale and keeping a relationship alive. Like the bakery clerk and the hungry family, someone may need to intervene so that various parties are understood.

As new regulations are put into place, what investors will read likely reflects the need for the seller to comply. Compliance text is not necessarily the type of plain language that would better aid buyers in making an informed decision. This is not good. Investors need to understand what is at stake. Investment management service providers can benefit, sometimes materially so, by conveying concepts in plain language.

ERISA Pension Plans: Due Diligence for Hedge Funds and Private Equity Funds

 

Join me on May 1, 2012 for a timely and interesting program about alternative investment fund due diligence and other considerations for ERISA plan sponsors, their counsel and consultants. Click here for more information.

This CLE webinar will provide ERISA and asset management counsel with a review of effective due diligence practices by institutional investors. Best practices will be offered to mitigate government scrutiny and suits by plan participants.

Description

With the DOL's and SEC's new disclosure rules and heightened concerns about compliance and valuation, corporate pension plans that invest in alternatives must focus on properly vetting asset managers more than ever before or risk being sued for poor governance and excessive risk-taking.

The urgencies are real. The use of private funds by asset managers is crucial for 401(k) and defined benefit plan decision makers. Understanding the obligations of private funds is essential to any retirement funds with limited partnership interests.

In addition, suits and enforcement actions against asset managers make it incumbent on counsel to hedge fund and private equity fund managers to fully grasp and advise on full compliance with the duties of ERISA fiduciaries to plan participants.

Listen as our ERISA-experienced panel provides a guide to the legal and investment landmines that can destroy portfolio values and expose institutional investors and fund managers to liability risks. The panel will outline best practices for implementing effective due diligence procedures.

Outline

  • ERISA fiduciary duties for institutional investors
    1. Hedge funds and private equity funds compared to traditional investments
  • Regulatory developments
    1. Disclosure
    2. Compliance
    3. Valuation
  • Developments in private litigation involving pension plan fiduciaries and alternative fund managers
  • Best practices for developing due diligence plans

 

Benefits

The panel will review these and other key questions:

Following the speaker presentations, you'll have an opportunity to get answers to your specific questions during the interactive Q&A.

  • Regulatory developments
    1. Disclosure
    2. Compliance
    3. Valuation
  • Developments in private litigation involving pension plan fiduciaries and alternative fund managers
  • Best practices for developing due diligence plans
  • What are the regulatory concerns for ERISA pension plans that allocate assets to hedge funds and private equity funds?
  • What are the potential consequences for service providers that fail to comply with new fee, valuation and service provider due diligence regulations?
  • What can counsel to pension plans and asset managers learn from recent private fund suits relating to collateral, risk-taking, pricing, insider trading and much more?
  • How should ERISA plans and asset managers prepare to comply with expanded fiduciary standards?

 

Following the speaker presentations, you'll have an opportunity to get answers to your specific questions during the interactive Q&A.

Faculty

Susan Mangiero, Managing Director
FTI Consulting, New York

She has provided testimony before the ERISA Advisory Council, the OECD and the International Organization of Pension Supervisors as well as offered expert testimony and behind-the-scenes forensic analysis, calculation of damages and rebuttal report commentary for various investment governance, investment performance, fiduciary breach, prudence, risk and valuation matters.

Alexandra Poe, Partner
Reed Smith, New York

She has over 25 years of experience in investment management practice counseling managers of hedge funds, private equity funds, institutional accounts, mutual funds and broker-dealer advised programs. She counsels hedge and private equity fund advisers in all stages of their business and due diligence matters.

 

 

Divorce and Asset Management: Not Better, Just Worse?

A recent news article about a hedge fund divorce is a good reminder that pensions, endowments and foundations can be adversely impacted by personal break-ups. (See "Ikos Divorce Rattles Firm; Cash Exits, Staff Gets Ax" by Cassell Bryan-Low, Wall Street Journal, July 26, 2010). Many hedge funds take the form of partnerships or private member entities such as an LLC. When ownership is concentrated in the hands of a few individuals, key person risk merits review, along with a need to ask tough questions about whether and what type of succession plan exists should a prominent player depart from the organization. When marital splits occur and the spouse cum business owner's wealth is concentrated in the equity of the hedge fund enterprise, a judge may force a liquidation to pay alimony. All of a sudden, buy side clients could find themselves with allocations in the hands of new managers, including perhaps the aggrieved husband or wife who now owns his or her "fair" share, post marital bliss.

While somewhat impolitic to inquire about one's hubby, wife or significant other as part of a hedge fund due diligence meeting, an institutional investor is certainly within its rights to ask about how the ownership of the fund as a business might change with a marital dissolution or a disagreement among partners or both. The issue is significant enough that some hedge funds have asked key employees to sign a post-nuptial agreement with the Mr. or Mrs as a way to protect company assets.

Ain't it romantic?

Editor's Notes:

  • When I was an appraiser and valued business interests such as ownership in a hedge fund, I co-authored "Complex Compensation Issues in a Divorce" (Forensic Accounting in Matrimonial Divorce, Journal of Forensic Accounting, 2005) with divorce financial planner, Ms. Lili Vasileff .
  • One of the few articles I've read about hedge fund succession planning is entitled "Planning for Hedge Fund Manager's Success" (Institutional Investor's Alpha, April 2004) by prominent investment attorney Stephanie Breslow.

 

Hamsters and Investment Governance

The plight of the hamster is simple. He is cute, furry and going nowhere fast. Sure he gets exercise but, measured in inches and miles, he's stuck in the same place, treading the same pattern over and over again.

Lest this sound like a zany rant from a busy blogger, might I suggest that the current spate of "pay to play" scandals reflects what some in the industry have been saying for years? Be scared, be very scared about the dsyfunction that is roiling financial markets. 

With respect to writer George Santayana, "Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it." With Enron, Worldcom and Bear Stearns far from a distant memory, why on earth are we still reading about bad players who end up costing taxpayers, shareholders and innocent bystanders gazillions of dollars? Worse yet, those individuals who wear the fiduciary hat proudly are being unfairly tainted by those who should know better and/or simply do not care about the lives they ruin with their bad acts.

Recent articles about California and New York pension problems only add fuel to the fire and leave most folks scratching their heads, asking legitimate questions, some of which are listed below:

  • Given existing regulations, why are there so many scandals?
  • Where is the board oversight that is supposed to prevent conflicts of interest or at least nip things in the bud before losses mount?
  • How much are Sally and Joe "everyperson" supposed to tolerate in terms of broken trust on the part of those tasked with leadership?
  • Why aren't major lessons being learned sooner than later?

As an ardent advocate of capitalism (and no, we do not have a pure capitalistic system in place anywhere, contrary to Michael Moore's movie lament), I find the current state of affairs impossible to defend.

Bad practices have got to stop. We need to be moving forward, not running around and around, making no progress and chasing our tails. Let me also add that I am not objective here. Our company (newly named Investment Governance, Inc.) has been busy at work for nearly a year, building investment "best practice" tools (to debut in short order). What has kept our team going lo these many months of 15 hour days are the repeated and strident cheers from all the good guys and gals who take their institutional fiduciary work seriously and want things to improve in a big way.

Bravo to those for whom trust is a sacred word! We seek to help you gain the recognition and support you so richly deserve. 

Trust, Institutional Investors and Their Service Providers

 

Financial scandals, decimated 401(k) plans and significant fallout on Wall Street are only a few of the pain points that leave one longing for halcyon days of yore. There is a lot of talk about broken promises and attempts to regain client trust.

Even outside the financial services sector, long known for its reliance on interpersonal relationships, sellers are working hard to rekindle the love with their consumers. In "Corporations work to regain customers' trust" (September 18, 2009), Business Week reporters David Kiley and Burt Helm write that "In the world of branding, trust is the most perishable of assets." Adding to marketers' woes, recent polls suggest gross unhappiness with business in general, something that slick ads are unlikely to fix.

Closer to home, "Can You Trust Your Consultants and Service Providers? (Human Resources, October 2009) addresses the critical relationship between service providers and consultants and 401(k) plan fiduciaries. The article quotes Nixon Peabody attorney Sherwin Kaplan as saying that "trust with providers should be earned, not implied" and that sponsors must properly select and then monitor each vendor. Aside from the obvious problems associated with conflicts of interest and fees, Attorney Kaplan mentions new worries in the form of fiduciaries suing each other over questions about suitability and due diligence.

In yet another related item, uber venture capitalist Fred Wilson opines on "Ten Characteristics of Great Companies" (September 3, 2009) with attribute number 10 being that "Great companies put the customer/user first above any other priority." We concur absolutely but know that more than a few service providers are challenged to deliver above and beyond the call of the duty at the same time that sales and client relationship management budgets are being cut to (in some cases) unsustainable levels. 

In "Broker's World: Fiduciary-Like Process Could Become Voluntary" (September 23, 2009), Wall Street Journal reporter Annie Gasparro describes the inevitability of a national (U.S.) focus on new broker-dealer rules. Boston University law professor Tamar Frankel is quoted as saying that "If the clients can trust them, they won't have to do all the freebies like lunches to get their business."

As both a buyer and seller of services, I like to think that my perspective considers both sides of the aisle. In the spirit of open conversation, I've listed a few thoughts below. I welcome your comments.

  • Integrity (a precursor to building a relationship of trust) must be a core element of an organization's enterprise-wide culture.
  • Customer service does not have to deteriorate with budget cutbacks.
  • Discounting of fees does not necessarily translate into automatic trust, especially if it encourages a service provider to cut back on quality or lose money instead.
  • Clients should be willing to provide constructive feedback to service providers before calling it quits. A reasonable period of "remedy" should be decided upon before pulling the plug.
  • The compensation structure on both the buy and sell side should encourage long-term value maximization on behalf of relevant constituencies.
  • Conducting assessments as to what remains critically important to institutional investors versus "nice to have" or "waste of time" should occur on a regular basis.

It is undeniably a brave new world. Without trust and a focus on long-term relationship building, new business for investment service providers may end up costing a bundle. Instead of being hired to "rescue" institutional investors such as pensions, endowments and foundations by granting advice, an absence of trust could induce more risk in the form of litigation and harm to reputation, resulting in service providers themselves asking for a safety net.