ERISA Litigation Costs

After having just blogged about the April 13-14, 2015 American Conference Institute program about ERISA litigation in Chicago, it was somewhat coincidental that an article on the same topic crossed my desk today, painting a grim picture of what could happen to a plan sponsor in the event of a lawsuit.

While only two pages long, "An Ounce of Prevention: Top Ten Reasons to Have an ERISA Litigator on Speed Dial" invites readers to consider the advantages of staying abreast of increasingly complex rules and regulations as part of a holistic prescription for mitigating legal risk. Authors Nancy Ross and Brian Netter (both partners with Mayer Brown) cite "heightened interest" in ERISA by U.S. Supreme Court justices, a rise in U.S. Department of Labor enforcement and court decisions about the importance of having a prudent process. They add that de-risking compliance, disclosure requirements, conflicts of interest, large settlements and attorney-client privilege restrictions are other potential landmines for a public or private company that offers retirement benefits.

Elsewhere, Employee Benefit Adviser contributor, Paula Aven Gladych, predicts that the U.S. Supreme Court review of Tibble v. Edison International ("Tibble") could increase ERISA litigation risk for plan sponsors, regardless of its decision. In "Edison decision could be 'slippery slope' for plan fiduciaries" (February 26, 2015), she writes that "the court focused its attention on duty to monitor fees and investments, generally by investment committees and plan administrators of 401(k) plans." Interested readers can download the February 24 2015 Tibble hearing transcript.

Recent events reflect multi-million dollar resolutions, even when an ERISA litigation defendant feels strongly that it is in the right. In "Settlements offer lessons in breach suits" (Pensions & Investments, February 23, 2015), Robert Steyer reports that publicly available documents can shed light about what types of disputes are being settled, the dollar amounts involved and any non-monetary requests made by the plaintiffs. Competitive bidding as part of selecting a vendor is one example. He goes on to say that regulatory opinions are thought to be particularly helpful when they are viewed by the retirement industry as de facto guidance.

I will report back after attending the ERISA litigation conference in a few weeks although I suspect that judges, litigators and corporate counsel who speak will convey a similar message with respect to fiduciary scrutiny. As Bob Dylan sang, "the times they are a-changing."

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