Decision Making When You Don't Like Your Colleagues

As an independent economic consultant, I am fortunate to have flexibility as to project selection and the make-up of my team. From what I hear from colleagues, others don't feel as lucky. They tell me they feel stuck in a situation where they have important duties to carry out but do not necessarily trust or like their work mates. This could be dangerous, especially since plan fiduciaries are exposed to personal liability.

I've heard some say that you can dislike someone yet still have respect for their knowledge and integrity. Others suggest that you may want to break bread with an individual over lunch but want to avoid having to depend on their judgment about serious matters. I supposed the ideal is to both like and trust someone to be careful about things such as vendor selection, changing an investment line-up, freezing a plan and so on. When the perfect combination of sparkle, professionalism and gray matter is non-existent, what should a fiduciary do?

I haven't seen much on this topic about how to select someone to serve as a fiduciary of a pension fund with respect to their personality and integrity. One public plan trustee asked for my opinion about a committee on which he served. His concern had to do with what he deemed to be anemic attempts on the part of one of his colleagues to gather information about various asset managers and asset classes. His fear was that this person would vote "yea" or "nay" without a proper basis. I told him that his anxiety was far from trivial. Based on my experience, this gentleman was right to be scared. When a fiduciary breach complaint is filed, all past and present members of the investment committee are often cited as defendants. The notion is that the fiduciaries were making important decisions on a collective basis.

In my view, there is room for improvement as to how pension plan fiduciaries are selected, trained, monitored for appropriate performance and terminated, as needed. It wouldn't hurt to assess the friendliness factor of each candidate either. Not that everyone has to bond over Friday night pasta but the investment committee typically works as a team. It is important that the members of said team can have an open and meaningful exchange among one another, debate various topics in depth and decide what makes sense for participants thereafter. Speaking in plain language helps. See "Even Pension Board Members Can't Understand Pension Jargon" by Ari Bloomekatz (Voice of San Diego, September 5, 2014), for an interesting example of questions that fiduciaries are right to ask and the disparate level of investment knowledge reflected on a board.

If you have a good story to tell about investment committee dynamics, email contact@fiduciaryleadership.com.  

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