A Halloween Trick or a Halloween Trick from the Eighth Circuit?

ERISA legal expert and Ropes & Gray LLP partner, Attorney Andrew L. Oringer provides an interesting insight into a recent case about the investment of excess assets and prudence. The case he cites can be downloaded by clicking here. Note the court's opinion on page 5 wherein it writes that the plaintiff, seeking redress over a question of fees paid by the plan, cannot "bring suit because the plan's surplus was sufficiently large that the 'investment loss did not cause actual injury to plaintiff's interests in the Plan'."

Our thanks to Attorney Oringer for his contribution, provided below.

A Scary Halloween Gift from the Eighth Circuit?

So here's a question - you're managing an overfunded defined benefit plan (remember those) and you want to let your guard down. You want to roll the dice a bit or push the limit of what you can do with ancillary (non-investment) motivations, and you figure you can do so because you're playing with house money. At least, you want to play around just with some of the excess. Or maybe you're just a touch careless, albeit unintentionally so. What's the big deal?  After all, participants and beneficiaries are going to get their money, without government help, unless the whole overfunded thing goes to heck in a hand basket and turns radically south.

Now, you'd expect that you might be on the wrong end of this one, so, as your feet get colder, you poke around a bit. And what do you find? You find that you may indeed have a friend or two in the Eighth Circuit with an ever-so-slightly delayed Halloween present for you.  In McCullough v. AEGON USA, No. 08-1952 (8th Cir. Nov. 3, 2009), which follows its earlier decision in Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing, 284 F.3d 901 (8th Cir. 2002), the Eighth Circuit in effect seems to hold that one cannot violate the prudence rules with respect to the investment of excess assets.  (Note that the widely discussed 3M case may well be wrong on both of the issues considered there.)  Assuming AEGON is not reviewed en banc and reversed on rehearing, its confirmation of the 3M decision seems like a welcome development for those seeking to limit potential liability for investment decisions under a DB plan.

My advice, however, is to be careful, real careful, even in the Eighth Circuit. The reasoning of AEGON and 3M is so suspect that, outside the Eighth Circuit you would draw comfort from these cases at your own peril, and, even within the Eighth Circuit, I think you'd have to be at least a little concerned that any given case could be reversed by the nine old and young men and women in the black robes. Having said that, the cases are certainly nice precedent if you need to use them defensively

So: "Boo" or "Boo!" depending on your perspective.

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