Emotions, Trading Risk and the Twinkie Defense

Following on the heels of our March 15 post about emotions and retirement planning, another just published article addresses the role of the brain with respect to risk proclivity. In "The Science of Risk-Taking," TIME reporter Kate Stinchfield writes that thrill-seeking has a chemical payoff. Research suggests that higher risk tolerance relates to the reabsorption of dopamine, a neurotransmitter. Serotonin is a factor as well. Normal levels prevent erratic behavior. Testosterone is yet another consideration, with lower (higher) amounts linked to risk aversion (taking). Stinchfield quotes Professor Marvin Zuckerman (University of Delaware) as saying that "high-sensation seekers tend to underestimate the risk."

So does this mean that current excesses of financial risk-taking are tied to unusual brain activity? Can "bad" body chemistry interfere with the prudent process of implementing and monitoring risk controls?

"Sorry your honor, my chemical levels made me take wild, zany risks with other people's money." This sounds like the financial equivalent of the Twinkie Defense.

Trackbacks (0) Links to blogs that reference this article Trackback URL
http://www.pensionriskmatters.com/admin/trackback/64998
Comments (0) Read through and enter the discussion with the form at the end
Post A Comment / Question Use this form to add a comment to this entry.







Remember personal info?